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Year 7-10 Course Manual

Introduction

About this Manual

This manual has been designed to enable parents to talk to their children about their work on a regular basis. It will help parents to know what subjects their child is studying.

There will be an opportunity to discuss the teaching curriculum at a ‘Meet the Teachers’ evening for Year 7-12 in Term 1, Week 3.

If you have any questions as you go through this manual, please contact the Head of Students for Years 7-9, Mr Peletier, the Head of Students for Years 10-12, Mr Vasquez, or the Year 7-10 Form teachers straight away. We are more than happy to talk through any of the questions or concerns that you may have.

Heads of Learning Areas (HOLAs)

Area

Teacher

Email

Head of Christian Studies and VET

Mr Murray

cmurray@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of English

Mrs Erispe

herispe@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Health and Physical Education

Mr de Bruyn

ndebruyn@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Humanities

Mrs Erispe

herispe@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Mathematics

Miss Smoker

msmoker@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Science

Mr Taylor

ptaylor@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Technology and the Arts

Mr Kuipers

skuipers@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

The Year 7-10 Program

Assessment and Testing

Assessments for Years 7-8 will include tests, class work, presentations, and group work. Assessment for Years 9-10 students will be based on term work, tests, and exams. Semester exams are one part of a student’s total work which counts towards assessment, so it is important for students to be working hard continually. 

Year 7-10 students will be issued with two semester reports, at the end of Term 2 and again at the end of Term 4. In addition, an Interim Report will be issued during Term 1, to provide parents with some early feedback on their child’s progress and how they are settling into the year. Other learning areas will also be assessed, but less frequently.

Grade Descriptors

Students will receive a grade for each subject each semester. The grades which will be used are A, B, C, D or E.

Grades will be awarded according to the extent to which the student fulfils the requirements of each subject area.

Grade

Descriptor

A (Excellent)

The student has demonstrated excellent achievement of what is expected for this year level.

This grade means that the student has demonstrated:

  • the essential requirements of the course
  • a superior knowledge and understanding
  • competency in a wide range of skills
  • appropriate and ready application of knowledge and skills to new situations
  • worked at a very high standard overall

B (High)

The student has demonstrated high achievement of what is expected for this year level.

This grade means that the student has demonstrated:

  • the essential requirements of the course
  • a good knowledge and clear understanding
  • competency in a range of skills
  • reasonable success in applying knowledge and skills

C (Satisfactory)

The student has demonstrated satisfactory achievement of what is expected for this Year level.

This grade means that the student has demonstrated:

  • the essential requirements of the course
  • a knowledge of much of the content with reasonable understanding
  • adequate development of the fundamental skills
  • some success in applying knowledge and skills

D (Limited)

The student has demonstrated limited achievement of what is expected for this year level.

This grade means that the student has demonstrated:

  • the essential requirements of the course
  • limited knowledge of the content
  • limited development of the fundamental skills

E (Very Low)

The student had demonstrated very low achievement of what is expected for this year level.

This grade means that the student has:

  • failed to achieve the essential requirements of the course
  • little knowledge of the subject
  • demonstrated few of the relevant skills

Exams, NAPLAN and OLNA

Academic Standards

Rehoboth’s academic standard is excellent. This is contributed to by small class sizes, individual attention, and Rehoboth’s decision to specialise in the areas that most of our students need for tertiary entrance.

With good fundamental teaching, systems and methods, Rehoboth’s students compete with the best, as shown in the ATAR, NAPLAN results, and in academic competitions. In 2017 Education Perfect, Rehoboth ranked third in WA in Social Sciences (102 schools), Languages (107 schools), and English (122 schools) and thirteenth in Science (136 schools) against ALL schools. Our graduates have qualified in diverse areas, such as Medicine, Law, Engineering, Business, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, to name a few. Included among these are a member of the WA Parliament in the Legislative Council, the General Manager of 98.5 Sonshine FM, and a Captain of an AFL team.

Exams (Years 9-10)

Rehoboth’s Year 9-10 program encourages creative thinking, learning via discovery, and (most importantly) teaching students how to learn. We believe that it is important that students learn the skill of sitting exams to equip them for the demands of Senior Secondary.

Rehoboth runs Year 9-10 exams at both mid-year and end-of-year in English, Humanities, Maths, Science, Music, and Indonesian, as part of our rigorous and challenging approach. Teachers will prepare students for these exams, explaining the process and providing revision tips.

It is also important that parents work with their child to ensure that they are dedicating some time to study in the lead up to the exams.

NAPLAN (Year 7, Year 9)

NAPLAN testing identifies whether students have the literacy and numeracy skills that provide the critical foundation for their learning.

In the past few years, the Weekend Australian newspaper has ranked Rehoboth between 25th to 32nd school in WA, placing us as one of only a handful of low-fee schools consistently in the Top 50 Schools in the State.

OLNA (Year 10)

The Online Literacy and Numeracy Assessment (OLNA) provides two further opportunities in Year 10 for students who have not achieved Band 8 or higher in any of the three components of reading, writing, and numeracy in their Year 9 NAPLAN to meet these requirements.

This level is necessary to satisfy the minimum literacy and numeracy requirements to achieve the WACE in Year 12. After school tutoring is provided for students in literacy and numeracy to assist them in achieving this level.

Extension Programs

Instrumental Music Program

Students are invited to become part of Rehoboth’s expanding Instrumental Music Program (IMP). In addition to improving musical and creative skills, learning an instrument also develops a sense of commitment, perseverance, critical assessment, and time management. Creating music gives both enjoyment and a sense of achievement to students, boosting their confidence.

Lessons are offered on a weekly basis in an individual or group setting with specialist tutors on campus in ten instruments.

We also run a number of music ensembles, which are open to all College students. Students are encouraged to join a music ensemble to further their skills on their instruments; to learn about playing in a group environment; to meet new people; and to engage in performances on and off-campus.

The College runs a Year 7-8 Worship Band, a Year 9-10 Worship Band, and a Year 11-12 Worship Band, in addition to our Secondary Choir. For further information about ensembles, contact Mr Thomson.

TESLA (Technology, Engineering, and Science)

TESLA is an exciting extension elective offered to Year 9-10 students. See the course index for details.

Emergency Services Cadets

Rehoboth’s Emergency Services Cadet Unit meets in the Kenwick Gym on Thursday afternoons from 3:15-4:45pm. The Cadets program assists young people to develop practical life skills, leadership, teamwork, and initiative. Cadets learn about the diverse nature of WA’s emergency services and develop qualities of community responsibility and service. 

The Cadets Unit is made up of many Year 7-10 students, with Year 11-12 students serving as Cadet leaders, and a variety of Secondary School teachers as Instructors. There is no cost involved and Cadets are issued with a Cadet polo shirt and jumper that will be worn with their Rehoboth PE shorts and sneakers. 

The Cadet program includes an annual camp for cadets that regularly attend its weekly meetings.

 

Homework

Homework will be content that the teacher has instructed the students to complete at home. We believe that setting homework is important for reinforcing disciplined working habits as students go through school. It is also important that this homework level is gradually increased over the years and is not too time-consuming for the age of your child. The recommended time is a good balance between reinforcing and extending the work covered in class, while allowing for individual passions and pursuits of each child as well as family time.

We also encourage our students to get into the habit of study as part of their weekly homework routines, especially when there is no set homework. Study and revision are not only useful around test and exam times but are a vital part of the learning process. Revising a chapter from their Science book or re-reading a chapter from the English text are good examples of helpful study exercises.

Year 7-8 Curriculum

The Australian Curriculum is the basis of what is taught at Rehoboth, and is taught from an overtly Christian perspective. All Year 7-8 subjects in 2021 are taught in semester-length units which are graded and reported on at the end of each semester.

The school week is divided into 35 periods, each of 45 minutes. The table below shows the subject areas and their allocated teaching periods. There are three periods per week devoted to Christian Studies and Church History. Each day will include a devotion and prayer time.

Overview of the Year 7-8 Timetable

Subject

No. of Periods

English

5 periods

Humanities

5 periods

Mathematics

5 periods

Science

5 periods

Form Class

1 period

Christian Studies

2 periods

Church History

1 period

Health

1 period

Indonesian (and LITS)

2 periods

Music

2 periods

Physical Education

2 periods

Design and Technology

2 periods (1 semester)

Digital Technologies

2 periods (1 semester)

Food Science and Technology

2 periods (1 semester)

Visual Arts

2 periods (1 semester)

Total

35 periods per week

 

Streaming in Years 9-10

Streaming refers to the grouping of students within a certain ability range as a class. The objective is to allow ‘like’ students to move ahead at a pace which matches their abilities. 

The research is divided on the subject of streaming. At Rehoboth, we advocate streaming, but not for an entire year level or too early in a child’s development. In our experience the results of streaming are more often beneficial than otherwise, particularly in the case of individual subjects.

Within a streamed class setting, the teacher is able to set a suitable pace for the class and maintain that pace. The entire class is challenged at a level gauged to be appropriate for the whole group. The teacher can move ahead at a brisk pace with students who do not require as much supervision. In a class of struggling students, the same applies. However, a slower pace would be necessary, and a lower number would usually be assigned to this class if teaching is to be most effective. An education assistant may also be allocated to this group to work with students who need a lot of assistance. In either situation, the teacher is able to select an appropriate pace and move ahead with it. 

In a streamed class setting students are able to:

  •  motivate each other because they possess similar abilities
  • move ahead at the same pace because there are no major disparities in ability within the stream
  • grow in confidence and self-esteem as no one is made to feel inferior among his/her peers. In fact, they offer each other friendly competition, which is motivational.
Maths

At Rehoboth, Year 9 students are streamed into three Maths classes: 9.1A, 9.1B and 9.2. The aim of 9.2 is to help students improve their numeracy standards and work towards achieving the standards of the Western Australian Curriculum.

Year 9 students are streamed in Maths. Criteria for the selection is based on students’ Year 8 Semester 2 marks and in consultation with the Year 8 Maths teacher. The 9.1A/B Maths stream will be challenging, extensively covering the WA Maths Curriculum and, where appropriate, extending their knowledge. Success in this course will provide a firm foundation for 10.1 Maths or 10 Extension Maths, which leads on to any of the ATAR Maths units in Years 11-12 (which are used for university entrance).

The 9.2 Maths stream will provide a practical interpretation of the WA Curriculum. It focuses on consolidating core mathematical concepts and developing vital numeracy skills. The grade each student achieves is based on the Year 9 WA Curriculum Standard, thus the cut-offs for the 9.2 course are C (70-100%), D (50-69%) and E (0-49%). Success in this course will provide a firm foundation for General Mathematics units in Years 11-12. If a C-grade is maintained in Year 10.2 Maths, students are able to select Mathematics Applications ATAR (which can be used for university entrance).

There are three streams of Year 10 Maths in 2021: 10 Ext (Extension) Maths, 10.1 Maths and 10.2 Maths. Criteria for the selection is based on students’ Year 9 Semester 2 marks and in consultation with the Year 9 Maths teachers. 

In the 10 Ext Maths stream, students will cover both the Year 10 WA Curriculum and the Year 10A WA Curriculum. The 10 Ext curriculum is designed to extend students and begin some of the concepts required for Year 11 Maths Specialist ATAR and Maths Methods ATAR. 

In the 10.1 Maths stream, students will cover the Year 10 WA Maths Curriculum. Success in this course will provide a firm foundation for Year 11 Maths Application ATAR units. 

The 10.2 Maths stream provides a practical interpretation of the WA Curriculum and focuses on consolidating core mathematical concepts and developing vital literacy and numeracy skills. The grade each student achieved is based on the Year 10 W.A. Curriculum Standard, thus the cut-offs for the 10.2 course are C (70-100%), D (50-69%), and E (0-49%).

English

In Year 10, students are streamed into three English classes:10.1 Ext, 10.1 and a 10.2 class, while in Year 10 Maths, the class is streamed into 10 Ext, 10.1, and 10.2. Further details are provided in the subject description under the Maths and English course descriptions.

By Year 10, the differences between the three groups has grown. As Year 10 is the introduction to Year 11 (which divides into the ATAR and Vocational streams), the work becomes more difficult and the difference in levels between the groups becomes greater. Movement between the classes (especially upwards) becomes less likely.

Science and Humanities

In Science and Humanities there is no streaming in Year 9 or Year 10. However, in Year 10, these subjects are taught by multiple teachers who teach their speciality to both groups at different times.

Year 7-8 Course Index

Christian Studies and Form

Year 7

The Bible unit focuses on the Old Testament. We explore facts such as God’s establishment of kings, judges and prophets. The Old Testament timeline is explored as we engage in the books of laws, words of wisdom and covenants. Personal reflection is encouraged.

Each week, students are given feedback on their work. Students are also given the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of the weekly memory Bible verse. Form classes are an opportunity for teachers to show students how to study effectively, consolidate individual learning styles and build class camaraderie through team challenges.

Year 8

In the Bible unit, students will learn an overview of the New Testament. They will then study the book of Mark using Christianity Explained as a framework. They will explore the Beatitudes from the Gospel of Matthew.

The Year 8 Form is part of the school’s pastoral care program and is used for discussions, activities, guest speakers etc., relating to issues such as growing up, adolescence, living out our Christian faith, and being a Year 8 student.

Topics include:

  • understanding school expectations
  • goal setting and setting priorities
  • study skills
  • peer pressure
  • parent-teen relationships
  • time management
  • acceptance, friends, and mates
  • gossip and bullying.

The Form program also looks at opportunities for exercising leadership, awareness of our community and its needs, Christian service and supporting missions.

Church History

Year 7

Students will trace the growth and development of the Church during the Middle Ages as it became the dominant power in the Western world.

This ‘Age of Faith’ was set against the backdrop of the rise of Islam, the growing power and corruption of church leaders, and struggles for power with the empires of the East and West. Students will begin to recognise the issues which caused the Church to move away from Biblical teaching. It concludes with the emergence of the Renaissance and the dawning of new ideas.

The course is designed to help students relate past events to current trends and struggles in today’s Church, as well as to understand how Church History events have relevance to their own lives. 

Year 8

Students will explore the revolutionary ideas of the Reformation as it developed in different areas of Europe in the 16th century. They will become familiar with the stories of the leaders of the Reformation, such as Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Ulrich Zwingli. Reformational and Biblical truths such as justification by faith and the authority of Scripture will be discovered and discussed.

This course delves into the lives of heroes of the Reformation, while being honest about their humanity, as examples for modern Christians. It looks for ways in which students might emulate their steadfastness and stand for truth.

Students complete a Reformation project which allows them to connect the various threads of the Reformation story.

Design and Technology

Design and Technology is taken over a single semester.

Year 7

In this course, students will learn the basic principles of design through the medium of woodwork. Students will be taught to develop hand skills and safe work practices while developing their small design projects. This introduction to woodwork will primarily focus on simple timber joining and shaping techniques.

Year 8

During this course, students will be challenged to interpret design briefs, both as individuals and in small groups. This will enable them to tackle and creatively solve design problems. Students will also learn to safely and accurately construct basic timber joints and how to incorporate them into their practical work.

Digital Technologies

Digital Technologies is taken over a single semester.

Year 7

In Year 7, Digital Technologies focuses on further developing understanding and skills in computational thinking. Students will broaden their experiences as they engage with a wider range of information systems and get involved in national, regional, and global activities.

Students have opportunities to create a range of solutions, such as interactive web applications or simulations. They will explore the properties of networked systems and acquire data from a range of digital systems. Students use data to model objects and events. They further develop their understanding of the vital role that data plays in their lives.

Year 8

Students investigate the properties of networked systems and their suitability and use for the transmission of data types. They acquire, analyse, visualise, and evaluate various types of data and the complexities of storing and transmitting that data in digital systems.

Students use structured data to model objects and events that shape the communities they actively engage with. They further develop their understanding of the vital role that data plays in their lives, and how data and related systems define, and are limited by, technical, environmental, economic, and social constraints. 

Students have opportunities to plan and manage individual and team projects. They will consider ways of managing the exchange of ideas, tasks and files, and techniques for monitoring progress and feedback.

English

Year 7

The study of English in Year 7 aims to develop and practice skills in reading and viewing, writing, and listening and speaking. The course content focuses on building individual needs while considering students’ varied learning capabilities. Skills are developed through student participation in novel studies, book reviews, and individual reading programs. A range of short texts are examined in order to focus on comprehension skills, such as inferring information and applying that knowledge into other contexts. Reading for pleasure is promoted.

Writing activities ensure students focus on how to write in a range of different text types, including persuasive essays, descriptive writing, poetry, procedures, discussions, and reports. Students will master a range of proofreading and editing skills. There is a focus on using the different parts of speech correctly. Students learn spelling rules and explore words to enhance their vocabulary. 

In speaking and listening, students engage in listening activities and learn public speaking skills to build auditory and oral skills. Students will have opportunities to participate in a range of impromptu talks, prepared speeches, performances, and presentations.

Year 8

The Year 8 English course will involve a range of activities related to reading, writing, viewing, speaking and listening outcomes, including:

  • developing an understanding of the ways in which language is an aspect of human beings created in the image of God;
  • allowing them to think, order, reflect, respond, make meaning, communicate and operate in community;
  • using the conventions of Standard Australian English with increasing understanding, in a variety of forms and situations;
  • speaking, listening, viewing, reading, and writing effectively with purpose and critical awareness.

Students will learn formal language skills (including grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, comprehension, and spelling); writing in a range of forms and for different audiences and contexts; literary appreciation of different genres (including novel, short stories, poetry, and media); and creative writing, which is an integral part of the program and will be adapted to meet student needs. 

Speaking and presentation skills are included as part of the work, which involves the development of group discussion and listening skills.

All these tasks will encourage the extension of students’ creativity. Tasks will often include multiple skills and will give opportunities to students to use varied learning styles.

Food Technology

Food Technology is taken over a single semester.

Aprons

All students will need to purchase the full-length blue-and-white striped chef’s apron from the Uniform Shop, as part of their uniform requirements.

Year 7

This unit will provide students with an opportunity to develop skills and understandings in how food can be used to meet dietary needs. Students will develop an understanding of the importance of food safety and hygiene when preparing food. This will be developed through both practical and theory lessons. Students will learn to select and use appropriate tools and equipment to competently design, produce and evaluate simple food products.

Year 8

This unit enables students to explore food related issues through a range of practical experiences and apply aspects of the technology process to given design briefs using different technologies.

Year 8 Food Technology aims to continue developing students’ knowledge and skills in a range of areas such as making healthy food choices, developing management skills, correct food handling, and processing techniques to prepare a range of simple meals and snacks. Students will focus on the various groups of foods, their properties, and how to prepare them into a meal.

Health

Year 7

Our bodies are made by God and made in His image. It is our role to honour God with our bodies in the way we relate to others and look after ourselves. 

Students will learn about how to cope with change and how to become more resilient. Students will learn about effective methods of communication, dealing with stress, living an active lifestyle and how to positively interact with others. 

The course will also cover safety, accident prevention, hygiene, healthy relationships, as well as puberty and gender development.

Year 8

Students will learn about health issues from a Christian worldview. At Rehoboth, we respect the fact that parents may feel uneasy with topics relating to adolescence being discussed. Therefore, classes are split into boys and girls and material is discussed cautiously and sensitively in the light of Scripture. 

Topics include: self-worth, relationships (family, friends, and peer pressure), puberty, illness and disease (smoking, lifestyle diseases, nutrition).

Humanities

Year 7

The study of History provides opportunities for students to learn about God’s sovereignty over all nations and the peoples within them. History is ‘His’ story. We study the Ancient Roman Civilisation and its integral role in the Christian faith.

Geography involves the study of places and their liveability. This contributes to students’ awareness of economics, needs-based settlement and the development of community. Through project-based learning, we investigate water sustainability in relation to Australia and Asia Pacific, allowing for the development of creative and collaborative skills.

In preparation for the Year 7 Canberra Trip at the end of Term 2, the Civics and Citizenship unit allows students to investigate Local, State, and Federal Governments and the law-making process.

In Economics, students are introduced to the concepts of natural, human and capital resources, production, consumption and exchange, and supply and demand. Christian perspectives on conducting business in the marketplace, and how we use our talents to serve others, are discussed.

Year 8

The Geography units lay the foundation of the key questions in Geography. Students will gain an appreciation of the unique planet God has created. In studying Landforms and Landscapes, students will learn about the different types of landscapes and their distinctive landform features. They will learn about the relationship man has with the environment. 

Changing Nations includes a study of the causes and consequences of urbanisation and the patterns of settlement. The students will compare Australia’s patterns of settlement with that of an Asian country.

The History unit is an overview of the important features and events of the medieval period (feudalism, trade routes, voyages of discovery, contact and conflict). This will help students understand broad patterns of historical change. 

The first depth study is Investigating Medieval Europe, which covers the way of life in Medieval Europe. Students will investigate significant developments like the changing relationships between Islam and the West (the Crusades), the cathedral building era, and Medieval culture. 

The second depth study covers the Black Death in Asia, Europe, and Africa. Trade between Europe and Asia began the diffusion of culture, and brought the plague to Europe. Marco Polo’s contact with the Chinese and Mongol cultures during his travels led to the Age of Discovery and Imperialism.

In Economics and Business, students will look at how markets operate in Australia, how the government is involved in the market, and how the types of businesses (e.g. sole trader, partnership, etc.) respond to opportunities. 

The Civics and Citizenship unit will cover democracy and law in action in Australia. This will include the freedoms of speech, rights to assembly and religion. Students will investigate the electoral system, focusing on federal and state elections.

Indonesian

The acquisition of a second language can provide students will skills, attitudes, and knowledge that has value in an age when there is an increasing awareness of the world as a whole and its cultural and linguistic diversity. By studying Indonesian, students develop a better understanding of another culture.

As students learn Indonesian, they learn about the culture of one of Australia’s nearest neighbours. Indonesian is studied by all Endeavour students (except for LITS students) as an introduction to LOTE, or as a continuation of the LOTE studied in previous years.

Students learn Indonesian through a variety of means including involvement in the international Language Perfect competition. These opportunities further engage the students and provide a window into the world of another language and culture. Each year, we ask some of our participating students to give us their feedback: in 2020, Year 9 student Zoe Watson said, ‘I love Ed Perfect. It is an absolutely amazing tool for learning Indonesian’.

Year 7

The Year 7 Indonesian course begins with the basic skills of introducing oneself and moves through a variety of topics including my identity, my friends, my school, and our special food. The course provides an excellent foundation for students to learn and develop their understanding of basic Indonesian grammar as well as simple oral, reading, and writing skills. Classes are highly interactive, and every effort is made to use authentic materials in order to give students an in-depth understanding of the culture.

Year 8

In the Year 8 course, students are given the opportunity to use technology, eat authentic foods, and participate in roleplay. They interact with the language and develop cultural understandings in a range of different topics that cover my family holiday in Bali, shopping, and ceremonies.

Mathematics

Year 7

Mathematics is divided into a number of sections.

A major area of study in Number and Algebra is fractions, decimals, and percentages. Algebra, patterns and linear relationships are another focus area where students will learn many new concepts. The four operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division will continue to be developed.

Measurement and Geometry units will include area, perimeter and volume; solids and prisms; location and transformations; and geometric reasoning. These units allow for many hands-on activities and also how to use mathematical formulas correctly.

In Statistics and Probability, students will do experiments to calculate chance and probability. They will conduct surveys to collect data and make tables and graphs to display and analyse their information. They will also learn how to work out the mean, median, mode and range from a set of data. Students will continue to work on their speed, accuracy and strategies for Mental Maths. To be able to solve problems efficiently, students need to know how to use the four operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division quickly and accurately. Students will continue to practice the times tables. They will also use Maths IT programs as part of their learning.

Year 8

In Year 8, students will learn to solve everyday problems involving rates, ratios, and percentages. They will learn to recognise index laws and apply them to whole numbers. They describe rational and irrational numbers. Students solve problems involving profit and loss. They make connections between expanding and factorising algebraic expressions.

Students will solve problems relating to the volume of prisms. They will make sense of time duration in real applications. They will  identify conditions for the congruence of triangles and deduce the properties of quadrilaterals. Students will model authentic situations with two-way tables and Venn diagrams. They explain issues related to the collection of data and the effect of outliers on means and medians in that data.

Students will use efficient mental and written strategies to carry out the four operations with integers. They will simplify a variety of algebraic expressions and solve linear equations and graph linear relationships on the Cartesian plane. 

Students will learn to convert between units of measurement for area and volume. They will perform calculations to determine perimeter and area of parallelograms, rhombuses, and kites. They will name the features of circles and calculate the areas and circumferences. They will determine complementary events and calculate the sum of probabilities.

 

Music

Year 7-8 Performing Arts focus on music performance and theory, listening skills, composition, and arranging skills. Rehoboth holds an annual Arts Festival in September, in addition to regular concerts, assemblies, and performances (in local venues like Manoah Homes) in which students are invited to participate.

Year 7

The Year 7 Music course takes on a very practical approach to learning music, with the view that music is a gift from God and an outlet through which we can express our God-given talents and creativity. 

Students will participate in whole-class activities that support the development of singing, aural, and rhythmic skills through course work on music from other cultures and backgrounds. They will also develop their ensemble and performance skills through playing and creating music together. Students will learn the basic elements of music theory and apply this knowledge on various instruments.

Year 8

The Year 8 Music course continues the practical approach to music studies. In this course, students will study folk music, composition, and ensemble playing. 

Students will engage in a range of activities that will develop their practical and theoretical understanding of music. They will develop their ensemble and performance skills through creating songs together and learning to play the keyboard. This gives students the opportunity to explore the creativity that God has given to us, and also develop greater self-confidence and awareness of others.

Students will learn about basic music theory, aural skills, and making music through a unit on children’s music. Ensemble skills will be expanded on through a unit on the ukulele.

Students are encouraged to participate in one of the College’s bands or choir to expand on their music skills. Rehearsals for these ensembles are held once per week, and students will participate in various performances during the year. A list of ensembles and their rehearsal times will be provided to students at the start of the year.

Physical Education

In Physical Education, students apply appropriate motor skills and fitness components to a wide range of games and sports. We see ourselves as a Christ-centred community and so students are always encouraged to display appropriate behaviour and fair play.

Year 7

Students in Year 7 PE will participate in sports ranging from basketball, soccer, volleyball, athletics and swimming, to different sports that students may not have tried before, like lacrosse, indoor hockey and ultimate frisbee.

Physical Education promotes the value of physical activity in students’ lives. It gives students opportunities to learn about and practice ways of working with others and adopt and maintain a healthy, productive, and active life. Physical Education allows students to develop self-management skills in the areas of organisation, participation, and leadership.

Year 8

PE in Year 8 seeks to build on students’ prior learning by concentrating on key sports that have a College-wide focus. We organise representative teams to participate in interschool sports carnivals such as basketball, soccer, volleyball, athletics and swimming. Students are continually developed in these areas through their Physical Education classes. 

Students will also participate in other sports throughout the year, such as netball, soft cross, badminton and T-Ball. Underpinning the knowledge and skills in these sports is the development and understanding of personal fitness, interpersonal skills, and self-management skills. 

Students in Physical Education will often be challenged to think beyond a superficial level of learning about sport to explore how they can demonstrate Christ-like attitudes in the way they participate, encourage others, and aim for their personal best.

Science

Year 7

Year 7 starts with an introduction to the science laboratory, focusing on how we conduct scientific experiments safely and accurately. Students will study the forces and motions in our everyday lives and discover the difference between pure substances and mixtures. 

We investigate matter further by learning how to separate substances and obtain clean water, which links into the water cycle. We explore how it affects our lives and God’s mandate to be good stewards of the water we use. 

We look outside our own world into the universe and are humbled by the vast and amazing creation of God as we study the planets, our sun and moon and how our planet fits into God’s created universe. 

We zoom back towards the Earth, looking at our own energy resources and how we need to look after our environment. We study the classification of plants and animals and how this classification has developed over time, focusing on some key animal groups as well as how plants and animals interact in their environment.

Year 7-8 students annually participate in the Science Education Perfect Championships each year. Mukho Naw wrote, ‘Thank you, Mr Murray, for encouraging us to try our best in the competition. Education Perfect is a great app for learning and revising. I would like to continue learning’.

Year 8

Students are given opportunities to develop their basic laboratory skills and how to work scientifically through designing and conducting experiments. We focus on the building blocks of life, looking at how cells were discovered and their incredible complexity. We build on students’ knowledge to look at the human body as a whole, as well as various individual systems. We also study atoms – the building blocks that make up all substances. 

A large focus is placed on safe practice in chemistry as students will conduct basic chemistry experiments. Through exploring everyday experiences, we introduce some basic physics principles, such as conservation of energy, energy transformation, and different types of energy. Students are given a taste of what it is like to be an engineer through designing a machine. 

Our dynamic earth is constantly changing, and we investigate how the rock cycle creates this change. Students learn how the structure of materials influences how we choose to use them and identify everyday examples of rock and mineral use.

Visual Arts

Studying Visual Arts teaches and encourages students to think, imagine, create, communicate, and solve problems. Visual Arts encourages students to use their creative talents to appreciate the visual messages and metaphors seen in creation. Students are taught to express their ideas creatively and thoughtfully. 

Year 7-8 students have the opportunity to exhibit their art work at the Arts Festival in Term 3. The very best pieces are also entered in the Canning Show in November.

Year 7

The Year 7 Visual Arts program is an important foundational course that is designed to inspire and expand student knowledge, skills, and creativity. 

Students research and gain an appreciation for the styles and techniques of various art movements past and present. Skills and techniques are practiced using design, good composition, and colour through drawing activities as well as creative painting, collage, textiles, and sculpture. Acrylics and watercolours will also be used to create original paintings and abstract designs. 

Detailed learning about correct proportions in portraits and the human figure will help students mature in their spatial skills. Each student is given the freedom to discover their own talents in areas they are drawn to and realise their God given strengths.

Year 8

The Year 8 Visual Arts course allows students to further develop their skills in drawing, painting, printmaking, and ceramics while also giving them an in depth understanding of colour theory and perspective. 

Students will undertake many varied drawing activities throughout the year using pencil and charcoal. In painting, they will explore techniques in both watercolours and acrylic paints. Students will create original paintings and also study artworks from both well-known Australian artists as well as international master artists.

Students will undertake at least two sculptural assignments, including one ceramic project, which will be glazed and fired in the kiln. Students will also be given opportunities to practice their handwriting skills through calligraphy, using ink pens. 

The course helps students expand their creative problem-solving skills in the process of creating artworks. In Visual Arts, students are encouraged to give glory to God by trying their best and creating appropriate images.

 

Year 9-10 Course Index

Christian Studies

The Christian Studies course is currently being revised and rewritten. The course will differ from the outline below and these will be updated when completed.

Our desire for our students is to develop their sense of belonging, a spirit of excellence and a commitment to discipleship while at Rehoboth, developing their heads, hearts, hands and habits.

Year 9

Semester 1: God is king over the universe. He reigns in perfection, and cares for all in His kingdom. After the fall people stopped acknowledging God as king. They refused to love him and began to harm their neighbours. Jesus Christ is the epitome of a perfect king. We will be covering the following areas, as well as following a regular Bible reading program:

  • Creation to the Promised Land
  • Time of the Judges
  • The United Kingdom
  • The Divided Kingdom

In Semester 2 students study ‘In the Garden of Eden’. Human beings were created perfect and knew only to choose God, to choose right, and to choose life. With the Fall, human beings lost their ability to choose good, and instead chose evil. Human beings now naturally choose sin and sinful ways. Through studying ethics, ‘2-Ways to Live’, as well as following a regular Bible reading program, we are better equipped to live for God’s glory in a sinful world. Topics covered include:

  • How to make decisions on big and small issues in life
  • How to live life pleasing to God
  • How to discern between good and evil
Year 10

In Semester 1 students will examine how God has revealed Himself to us, through His word, creation ,and His Spirit. We are made in His image and He teaches us what to believe about Him. We are repaying God by making Him in our image. As we study the Scriptures, we get to know the God of the Bible in a deeper and more intimate way. God desires for us to see His hand of providence at work over history. The Gospel is great news! It is God’s rescue plan from the beginning of time. It is about Jesus, promised to us, and it is for sharing. We will be covering the following areas, as well as following a regular Bible reading program:

  •  Kids Evangelism Explosion
  • Doctrine

In Semester 2 students will example God’s desire that we live in unity. Man has various perspectives of the world. Sin has brought us disharmony with God, each other, and within us. What a difference Jesus makes! By coming to this world, Jesus has brought us God’s perspective. We will look at how to glorify God in our conflicts, taking the log out of our own eye and forgiving. Looking at the first eleven chapters of Genesis helps us to form a Christian worldview. We will be covering the following areas, as well as following a regular Bible reading program:

  •  Peacemaking
  • Worldviews

Further Information: Mr Murray (Christian Studies Coordinator)

English

Year 9

There is no streaming in Year 9 English. This course addresses the three modes of English (Literature, Literacy, and Language) included in the Australian Curriculum. The purpose of the Year 9 English course is to provide students with opportunities to:

  • develop an understanding of the ways in which language is an aspect of people being created in the image of God, allowing them to think, order, reflect, respond, make meaning, communicate, and operate in community;
  • use the conventions of Standard Australian English with increasing understanding, in a variety of forms and situations;
  • speak, listen, view, read, and write effectively with purpose and critical awareness, learning to critique all texts from a Christian worldview.

The first semester will focus on narrative and media texts and the second semester will focus on transactional writing, poetry, stage drama, and a close study of a novel. Students will learn formal language skills (including grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, comprehension, and spelling) and be given the opportunity to read for pleasure. 

Various forms of comprehension strategies and creative expression will be explored through analysis of short stories, novels, feature films, newspapers, poetry, magazines, and the internet. Emphasis will be placed on values and attitudes, context, and purpose. 

Students will develop their essay writing skills and other forms of creative and analytical written and oral expression. A close study of a novel will be completed with journal activities. Students will deconstruct a prescribed stage drama, write and perform an original stage drama text.

Year 10

In Year 10 English, students are streamed into 10.1 Ext, 10.1 and 10.2 classes, and the differences between these are quite significant as the work in Year 10 becomes more demanding. Movement between the classes (especially upwards) is possible, but the evidence necessary for such a move must be consistent across a number of assessment tasks. 

In English, while the 10.1 Ext and 10.1 classes each study Australian culture, poetry, a Shakespearean play, and a novel, the 10.2 English stream focuses more on the development and application of language skills through a range of less complex texts. 

The 10.1 Ext and 10.1 English streams prepare students for ATAR by developing the application of sophisticated vocabulary and genre-specific terminology in extended analytical and creative skills across both written and oral assessment tasks.

The Year 10 English courses include a range of activities related to reading, writing, viewing, speaking, and listening outcomes, including:

  • understanding the ways in which language is an aspect of humanity created in the image of God;
  •  providing opportunities for students to think, order, reflect, respond, make meaning, communicate, and operate in community;
  • using the conventions of Standard Australian English with increasing understanding, in a variety of forms and situations;
  • speaking, listening, viewing, reading, and writing effectively with purpose and critical awareness.

Students will continue to develop and demonstrate formal language skills (accurate application of grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, comprehension, and spelling); writing in various forms for a broad range of audiences and contexts; literary appreciation of diverse genres (including novel, short stories, poetry, and media); and creative writing. 

Individual and group speaking, and presentation skills are included as these activities require group discussion and mature listening skills and confidence. These tasks aim to encourage the extension of students’ analytical and creative abilities. Tasks will often include multiple skills and will provide opportunities for students to use a variety of learning styles.

Further information: Mrs Erispe (Head of English and HASS)

Form

Students meet on a weekly basis in House groups, led by a member of staff. These small group gatherings enable students and teachers to connect with each other in a more relational context.
During Form class students are given instruction on effective study habits, exam preparation, upcoming events, road safety programs, personal growth, and so on.

Humanities

Year 9

In Year 9, students study units in Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography ,and History. They will be reminded of the commandments of Jesus to love God and our fellow neighbour in the choices we make individually and as a community.

In Civics and Citizenship, students will build on their understanding of the concepts of the Westminster system of democracy and justice. They will examine the role of key players in the political system and analyse the way citizens make decisions. They will also learn how Australia’s courts work in support of a democratic and just society. 

In the Economics unit, students will be introduced to the concepts of specialisation while continuing to further their understanding of the key concepts of scarcity and consumer sovereignty. They will examine the connections between consumers, businesses ,and governments in the provision of goods and services. 

The two Geography units are ‘The Geographies of Interconnection’ and ‘Biomes and Food Security’. The students will learn about our responsibilities in a globalized world. 

The History units cover the Industrial Revolution and First World War, where students will investigate Australia’s role in a technological world and our role as peacekeepers in the world are investigated.

Year 10

In the History units of ‘Investigating World War Two’ and ‘Rights and Freedoms’, students will investigate key concepts within the context of the modern world and Australia from 1918, with an emphasis on Australia in a global context. Students will be encouraged to act as agents of change by identifying and responding to injustices that shape our nation. 

In the Civics and Citizenship unit, students will learn the key features of the Australian democratic system and compare them with one other system in the Asian region.

In the Economics unit, students are introduced to the concept of economic performance and living standards while continuing to further an understanding of the concepts of making choices. God expects us to be wise stewards of the resources He has provided. 

In the Geography units of ‘The Geography of Wellbeing’ and ‘Environmental Change and Management’, the students will explore case studies with a local, national and global context.

Further Information: Mrs Erispe (Head of English and HASS)

Mathematics

Year 9

In Number and Algebra, students will solve problems involving simple interest. They apply the index laws to numbers and express numbers in scientific notation. Students expand binomial expressions. They find the distance between two points on the Cartesian plane and the gradient and midpoint of a line segment. Students sketch linear and non-linear relations.

In Measurement and Geometry, students interpret ratio and scale factors in similar figures. They explain similarity of triangles. Students recognise the connections between similarity and the trigonometric ratios. They calculate areas of shapes and the volume and surface area of right prisms and cylinders. Students use Pythagoras’ Theorem and trigonometry to find unknown sides of right-angled triangles.

In Statistics and Probability, students calculate relative frequencies to estimate probabilities, list outcomes for two-step experiments and assign probabilities for those outcomes. They compare techniques for collecting data from primary and secondary sources. Students construct histograms and back-to-back stem-and-leaf plots.

Year 10

In Number and Algebra, students will recognise the connection between simple and compound interest. They solve problems involving linear equations and inequalities. Students make the connections between algebraic and graphical representations of relations. They expand binomial expressions and factorise monic quadratic expressions. Students find unknown values after substitution into formulas. They perform the four operations with simple algebraic fractions. Students solve simple quadratic equations and pairs of simultaneous equations.

In Measurement and Geometry, students solve surface area and volume problems relating to composite solids. They recognise the relationships between parallel and perpendicular lines. Students apply deductive reasoning to proofs and numerical exercises involving plane shapes. They use triangle and angle properties to prove congruence and similarity. Students use trigonometry to calculate unknown angles in right-angled triangles.

In Statistics and Probability, students compare data sets by referring to the shapes of the various data displays. They describe bivariate data where the independent variable is time. Students describe statistical relationships between two continuous variables. They evaluate statistical reports. Students list outcomes for multi-step chance experiments and assign probabilities. They calculate quartiles and inter-quartile ranges.

Further information: Miss Smoker (Head of Mathematics)

Science

Year 9

In Year 9 Science, students will have the opportunity to develop their scientific skills by engaging with investigative and problem-solving processes. Throughout the year students will learn to critically analyse data, evaluate scientific theories, develop inquiry questions, and communicate their scientific knowledge with others. As they learn about the world around them, students will be led to marvel at their Creator. 

Science is divided into four interconnected fields of study: Biological, Chemical, Physical, and Earth and Space.

In Biological Science, students will explore the interdependencies between all living things and their environment. We will then examine how our own bodies rely on the interdependency of all our body systems.

In Chemical Science, the atom takes centre stage as we explore radiation, its uses, its dangers, and its origins. We will investigate the different types of reactions and how they are used in industry.

In Physical Science students will conduct an inquiry project into how energy is used to communicate. They will question the safety and use of different forms of energy before getting hands-on with electrical circuitry.

In Earth and Space Science, the Earth is our focus. How do we know what it is made of? What forces are causing our planet to change? Can we explain volcanoes, earthquakes, mountain ranges? This topic asks students to question what evidence they have for their beliefs about planet earth.

Year 10

The units of study in this course are divided into the areas of Biological Science, Chemical Science, Earth and Space Science, and Physical Science.

The Biology unit provides students with an introductory understanding of genetics, inheritance, and how genetic information can change over time. This topic will cause students to think about the ethical and moral questions raised by modern technology, issues like designer babies and genetic screening. Students will also be introduced to evolutionary theory and begin to cross examine the different types of evidence used to support the theory.

The Chemistry unit focuses on the structure and characteristics of atoms and molecules, how they react, and how this relates to radioactivity. In this study, matter, beauty, harmony ,and order should emerge as a tribute to the only Creator of all things.

The Earth and Space unit will explore the heavens. What are stars and how do they work? What can we learn about the universe by studying the stars? These questions will allow students to learn about nuclear fusion, particle physics, stellar parallax, and the beauty of God’s creation. Students will be confronted with different worldviews to their own and will need to develop the ability to appraise and understand different perspectives.

The Physics unit introduces the natural laws in God’s created order. Topics presented are: kinematics (the study of motion), energy, work, and power. Students should be prepared to be involved with experimental work in small groups. Skills to be learned are: efficient manipulation of lab equipment, measurement and recording of data, analysis and interpretation of data. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in mathematics.

Further Information: Mr Taylor (Head of Science)

Health and Physical Education

Year 9

Rehoboth’s Year 9 program encourages students to refine and apply strategies for maintaining a positive outlook and evaluating behavioural expectations in different leisure, social, movement ,and online situations. Students learn to critically analyse and apply health and physical activity information to devise and implement personalised plans for maintaining healthy and active habits. They also experience different roles that contribute to successful participation in physical activity and propose strategies to support the development of preventive health practices that build and optimise community health and wellbeing.

Focus areas to be addressed in Year 9 include:

  • Health benefits of physical activity
  • Alcohol and other drugs
  • Food and nutrition
  • Healthy relationships.
Year 10

In Year 10, students learn to apply more specialised movement skills and complex movement strategies and concepts in different movement environments. They also explore movement concepts and strategies to evaluate and refine their own and others’ movement performances. Students analyse how participation in physical activity and sport influence an individual’s identities and explore the role participation plays in shaping cultures. The program also provides opportunities for students to refine and consolidate personal and social skills in demonstrating leadership, teamwork and collaboration in a range of physical activities.

Focus areas to be addressed in Year 10 include:

  •  Mental health and wellbeing
  • Relationships and sexuality
  • Risk-taking and personal safety

Further Information: Mr de Bruyn (Head of Health and PE)

Year 9 Electives Index

Church History

Summary

More Information: Mrs Vivian (Church History Teacher) 

Background

Any student may enrol, though previous study of Church History in lower grades is advantageous.

Purpose

This course aims to connect the history of the modern Church to students’ own church experience and understanding, and to develop a love for Christ’s body. It is designed to present Church History figures as real men and women of God who were used to accomplish God’s purposes. In this way, students are encouraged to seek God’s will and purposes for themselves as members of Christ’s Church.

Students are also encouraged to use historical thinking and skills to reflect meaningfully on historical events and their impact on today’s Church. 

Course Description

Year 9 Church History will investigate the themes and movements in the Modern Church (17th-20th Centuries). It will consider five themes:  

  • The Church Established: the development of Anglicanism, its conflict with Non-Conformity and Puritanism, and the development of denominationalism, especially in Australia.
  • The Church Attacked: the Church in the Age of Enlightenment, Rationalism and Romanticism, the persecuted Church.
  • The Church Revived: the First and Second Great Awakening, Christian Philanthropy, the Pentecostal/Charismatic movement.
  • The Church Accommodated: the rise of Liberalism.
  • The Church Defended: the Great Century of Missions, Fundamentalism, Christian apologetics.

Students will complete a project that traces these themes through the modern era. In addition, students will consider a variety of viewpoints in the Christian Church and express their own perspectives, whilst learning to bring all ideas under the authority of Scripture. The course will allow students to read a number of primary sources by noted Christian writers. Guest speakers will present on a number of related topics (as available).

Design and Technology

Summary

More information: Mr Kuipers (HOLA)

Purpose

All people are made in the image of their creator God. Through good design we glorify our great designer. This practical course is designed to develop students’ understanding of the importance of effective design as well as the correct and safe use of tools, materials ,and techniques to achieve a desired outcome. 

Course Content

Students will learn to develop a design brief, work within set restrictions ,and use the design process to develop their ideas. A major project will be to design and construct a small stool or small table prototype that represents a proper balance of form and function: aesthetic appeal and practical purpose. 

This year-long course will also cover aspects such as selection of materials and fittings, sustainability, production procedures, and computer aided design (CAD). Students will be exposed to new machines, tools, and techniques that will enable them to continue to safely develop their skills in construction.

Food Technology

Summary

More information: Mrs Howard (Food Technology Teacher), Mr Kuipers (HOLA)

Background

This course aims to enable students to build on and develop their practical skills to choose and prepare foods for enjoyment and health. 

Purpose

The course focuses on developing advanced skills in food handling, preparation, and presentation. The course will encourage the development of independence and confidence when working in the kitchen environment. It will provide students with opportunities to engage in weekly practical cooking lessons where they will consider the nutritional needs of teenagers and the impact their choices will have on health and the environment. 

Students will be encouraged to develop their creativity and design skills using the technology process to help develop solutions to design briefs.

Course Description

Students will focus on two units of food production based on the themes of:

  • Menu Planning: Students will consider meal planning principles for a variety of menus suitable for well-balanced breakfast, lunch, and dinners catering for the needs of individuals with a focus on breakfast planning for students on the go.
  • Healthy Foods Fast: The place of fast foods will be investigated, with a focus on developing food preparation skills to enable students to prepare food that is quick, nutritious, and cost effective, as an alternative to take away foods.

Indonesian

Summary

More information: Mrs Anggadjaja (Indonesian Teacher)

Background
  • Students with limited Indonesian may enrol.
  • Switching between two languages has been compared to mental gymnastics and is good for brain development.
  • In Year 9 there is the opportunity to travel to Indonesia and participate in a Language Program.
  • At the end of Year 12 there is a Languages ATAR bonus. If the student has a scaled score in Indonesian, 10% of the Indonesian scaled score is added to their Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (best four scaled scores). Your child will receive this bonus even if Indonesian was not counted in one of their best four.
  • After high school and in the future work force, two skills that will be in highest demand are digital literacy and bilingualism.
  • Jesus said that the second greatest commandment was to love our neighbours as ourselves. Learning Indonesian, the language of one of our closest neighbours, covers 240 million people (the 4th most populated country).
Purpose

This course introduces students to the Indonesian language and culture from a personal perspective, enabling them to share personal information from others related to personal identity, aspects of living in Indonesia, and popular culture.

Course Description

Students will begin to develop an understanding of what it is to be Indonesian and Indonesian-speaking and compare their own lives to those of others in Indonesia. They will also begin to develop the skills and strategies to use Indonesian to achieve the outcomes of the unit. Students will learn about their own world and their personal identity, including relationships, daily activities, and aspects of youth life and popular culture.

Music

Summary

More information: Mr Thomson (Music Teacher), Mr Kuipers (HOLA)

Background

Students will preferably have basic music theory skills and knowledge as a prerequisite to this course. While it is normally expected that students will have completed Year 8 Music prior to studying Year 9 Music, exceptions may be granted at the discretion of the teacher. It is recommended that students are undertaking lessons with a specialist music tutor in order to successfully complete performance assessments.

Purpose

Music is a social art that allows students to interact with others, express themselves ,and ultimately bring glory and praise to God. This course will enable students to explore their God-given musical talents through performing, singing, and creating music.

Course Description

Year 9 Music provides students with the opportunity to develop their musical skills. Students will learn more about playing the ukulele, building on work from Year 8 Music. Through their study of the ukulele, students will learn about music theory, aural, listening, music analysis, singing, performing, improvising ,and creating music. They will also learn about performance, practice and ensemble playing.

On top of learning the ukulele, students will also learn how to compose music using software on the College MacBooks. Students will complete assessments on aural, theory, compositional, and performance skills. 

Students are encouraged to join a school music ensemble to supplement their study of music; however, this is not a mandatory requirement for this subject. A list of ensembles and their rehearsal times will be made available at the start of the year.

Music (Specialist)

Summary

Prerequisites: Selected students will be invited to join and are not required to audition. Invitations for Specialist Music will go out to high-achieving Music students in Year 8 who demonstrate excellence in instrumental skill and an aptitude for music theory. External students looking to join the program in Year 9 may need to go through an audition process.
More information: Mr Thomson (Music Teacher), Mr Kuipers (HOLA)

Background

God made music and it belongs to Him, all of it. He has graciously given us the skills and opportunities to learn music and He intends for us to engage with it in ways that honour Him. This course is designed to provide an avenue of extension for high achieving music students with additional focus on guiding them to resist the relentless lure of self-acclaim and instead consider how they can use their gifts to serve Him and others. It is centred around playing contemporary music in the group band setting and will include a compulsory after-school rehearsal once per week.

Purpose

The goal of our music program is to encourage and equip students to delight in God and serve others through a life-long enjoyment and participation of music. This goal underpins a progression of learning throughout the Year 7-12 music courses and informs the trajectory of the year 9 Specialist Music elective.

Course Description

As part of this course students will explore the history of contemporary western music. They will learn songwriting skills and will learn to play a wide range of musical genres in their band groups. Students will be challenged to pursue genuine excellence in a fun and joyful environment and will have the opportunity to participate in rewarding performance experiences.

Specialist Sport

Summary

More information: Mr Peletier (Year 9 Specialist Sport teacher), Mr de Bruyn (HOLA)

This course suits students that have an interest in sport and wish to develop a greater understanding of sporting concepts. The course particularly serves those students who are interested in Specialist Sport in Year 10 and Physical Education Studies in Years 11-12.

Purpose
  •  To focus on developing advanced skills in key sports throughout the course.
  • To gain knowledge and understanding of physical fitness and fitness components used to compete with excellence in sport.
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of nutrition in physical activity.
  • To be able to identify fundamental movement patterns in sport through the study of anatomy and physiology.
  • To establish a pathway for those interested in studying Physical Education Studies in Senior School.
Course Description

The Specialist Sport course seeks to encourage students to persevere with developing and finetuning their skills in physical activity. It is predominantly a practical subject with a theory component. The theory component will focus on fitness, nutrition, anatomy and physiology for sport.

Requirements

Students must wear sports sneakers (no flat canvas shoes) and sports uniform in each lesson.

TESLA (Technology, Engineering, and Science Learning Academy)

Summary

More information: Mr Taylor (HOLA)

Background

Students who have an interest in Science, Mathematics, Design, and Arts and like to apply principles from each field of knowledge to solve real world problems will enjoy TESLA, which is based on the principles of STEM/STEAM. This course will build on some of the skills learnt in Year 7-8 Digital Technologies.

Purpose

TESLA represents an integrated approach to learning that reflects the integrated nature of God’s creation. It brings together students’ understanding from multiple disciplines to engage them in developing culture — with a focus on technology — that contributes to shalom. 

Skills such as programming, robotics, and design process are not learnt and developed for the sake of the skills themselves, rather, they are important to the development of kingdom citizens who are equipped to engage with God’s world and with the culture around them. TESLA provides one avenue for this at Rehoboth. Technologies are shaping us, whether we are aware of it or not, and TESLA aims to equip students to shape rather than be shaped.

The course will also introduce students to the wide array of job opportunities in the STEM field and provide opportunities to compete with other schools in designing innovative solutions to real-world problems.

Course Description

In Semester 1 students will look at learning to code Lego Mindstorm robots and compete in the RoboCup competition. This will teach problem solving and is a good introduction to coding and robotics. We will also take part in the Game Changer Awards, a design process competition that engages students in problem solving, prototyping, and presentation of a solution.

In Semester 2 the focus is the First Lego League Robotics competition. This is an international competition that aims to equip students with coding, robotics, and engineering skills whilst also encouraging students to engage with problems in their community. There are three components to this competition:

  • Teamwork and core values
  • Robot design and programming
  • Project

Each year the project tackles a current issue in our communities.

Visual Arts

Summary

More information: Mr Kuipers (HOLA) 

Students who have a strong desire to extend their ability in design development, composition, drawing, painting, printmaking ,and sculpture are encouraged to join this course.

Purpose

The projects we undertake will stimulate the students’ ability to think laterally to solve design and construction challenges. Creating works of art involves the artist selecting and arranging lines, shapes, colours, tones, textures ,and materials until an arrangement is achieved to which nothing may be added, taken away, or moved without reducing its expressive power.

By developing skills in Visual Arts, students learn to express themselves in constructive ways, which helps them clarify their abilities to understand themselves and the world around them. Through teaching within a Christian perspective, students learn to observe and appreciate God’s creation through studying the shapes, colours, patterns, and forms of His world. In addition, students gradually acquire the art of moral discernment within the Visual Arts.

Course Description

Drawing forms the basis of design work as well as how we interpret the world around us. The beginning of this course will have a strong emphasis on developing drawing skills in different contexts and settings, using a variety of media.

The course will explore a variety of painting mediums and techniques using themes from both the realistic and the abstract approach. This course will cover an extensive use of media: pencils, charcoal, watercolours, inks, acrylic paints, aquarelles, chalk ,and oil pastelles. In this course we will also be creating three-dimensional works of art using clay and plaster. 

Students will learn about the glazing and firing process in ceramics. Students are required to keep an art folio with their design work and records of each project, including self-evaluations. These are an integral component of individual artistic development.

Year 10 Electives Index

Design and Technology

Summary

Line: Three
More information: Mr Kuipers

Background

The world around us is evidence of the existence of a God who is not only extravagantly creative but also deliberately ordered. The majority of this Year 10 Design and Technology course will focus on the ordered design and production process and the development of carpentry and furniture making skills.

Course Description

During Term 1 students will develop and communicate a table design idea while researching historical design styles and trends. Their own design brief will incorporate the influence of their chosen design period as well as the set restrictions of construction using the leg and rail method. 

Theoretical components of this course will include research into sustainability and the timber industry, timber properties and joining methods. Students will continue with their table design project throughout the year.

As a part of their major project, students will also be introduced to computer aided design (CAD) and will incorporate a designed feature into their project using a computer-controlled router. Alongside their major project students will also have the opportunity to experiment with plywood forming by developing their own bent ply design.

Drama

Summary

Line: Three
More information: Mr Dougherty

Background

2021 is the first year that we will have a separate class for Year 10 Drama students, as the course has historically run as a Year 9/10 combined class. It is desirable, but not required, that students to have completed Year 9 Drama. The minimum requirement is a willingness to participate. Students continuing the course from Year 9 can expect to develop their skills further and learn new styles, forms and techniques.

Purpose

The course continues to value the development of collaborative, interactive, and performance skills. Students will be expected to devise, learn, rehearse, and produce drama with their peers as an audience. Students will be challenged to stretch their physical performance skills and manipulation of space for audience effect, and to explore the possibilities of drama beyond acting and performing by looking at technical roles, different performance spaces, and combining performance with digital media.

Course Description

Commedia dell’arte is the drama form in focus for Semester 1. Originating in the 16th Century, this lively approach to theatre was the first ‘professional drama’ in history. There are no ‘plays’ as such; commedia requires actors to work with a scenario and use improvisation, audience involvement, and stock characters (identified with masks and specific movement sets). It is a physically challenging and highly rewarding form of theatre to study.

We pull out all the stops in Semester 2, being the last semester of Drama that these students will take. Students will be given a high level of responsibility and tasked with pulling together an ensemble production. It may be an adaptation of an existing script, or devised entirely by the students themselves, but students are responsible for everything from costumes to sound and lighting to choreography. The resulting play will be performed towards the end of the year in front of the whole school.

Food Technology

Summary

Line: One
More information: Mr Kuipers

Background

Food is a symbol of hospitality and is served at almost every social function. Students will learn to cook many of their favourite foods and more, as well as being given opportunities to use their skills to cater for a variety of school functions. Students will also learn to appreciate and respect other cultures through the preparation, cooking and serving of a wide variety of foods from other cultures.

Course Description

Students will focus on two units of food production based on the themes of:

  • Café Culture: Students will apply principles of menu planning and budgeting, while focusing on modern café menu design suitable for teenagers. Current food trends and products, as well as an introduction to barista skills will feature as part of their investigations.
  • International Foods: Students will investigate cultural factors influencing food and the impact of this on Australian society. They will explore techniques used to creatively produce foods from around the globe whilst developing quality food handling skills and techniques, as well as focusing on staple foods of each culture.

These units will encourage the development of independence and confidence when working in the kitchen environment. Students will have opportunities to engage in weekly practical cooking lessons whilst developing their creativity and design skills using the technology process to help develop solutions to design briefs. 

This course will also provide students with a firm foundation for the Year 11-12 Food Science and Technology General courses.

Indonesian

Summary

Line: Two
More information: Mrs Angadjaja

Background
  • Ideally, students will have studied Indonesian in Year 9. Alternatively, if they did not study Indonesian in Year 9 but obtained an ‘A’ or a high ‘B’ grade in Year 8 Indonesian, they may be eligible to join the course.
  • Switching between two languages has been compared to mental gymnastics and is good for brain development.
  • In Year 10 there is the opportunity to travel to Indonesia and participate in a Language Program.
  • At the end of Year 12 there is a Languages ATAR bonus. If the student has a scaled score in Indonesian, 10% of the Indonesian scaled score is added to the Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (best four scaled scores). The student will receive this bonus even if Indonesian wasn’t counted in one of his/her best four. 
  • After Secondary School and in the future work force, two skills that will be in high demand will be digital literacy and bilingualism.
  • Jesus said that the second greatest commandment was to love our neighbours as ourselves. Learning Indonesian, the language of one of our closest neighbours covers 240 million people (the 4th most populated country).
Purpose

Year 10 Indonesian builds on the skills, knowledge, and understanding developed in previous years and focuses on extending students’ oral and written communication skills and their understanding of Indonesian language and culture.

Course Description

The focus is on travel to and around Indonesia. The course aims to consolidate and develop basic knowledge and skills in Indonesian. Students will develop a sense of space and place related to Indonesia and the skills needed to travel within Indonesia, learning more about Indonesian-speaking communities and cultures.

Music

Summary

Line: One
More information: Mr Kuipers

Background

Students will preferably have basic to intermediate music theory skills and knowledge, or a minimum B grade in Year 9 Music, as a prerequisite to this course. Students who do not meet these prerequisites may approach the Music Teacher on an individual basis for permission to study Year 10 Music, with the understanding that extra catch-up work may be required of them. It is recommended that students be undertaking lessons with a specialist music tutor, in order to successfully complete performance assessments.

Purpose

Music is a social art that allows students to interact with others, express themselves, and ultimately bring glory and praise to God. This course will enable students to explore their God-given musical talents through performing, singing, and creating music.

Course Description

Year 10 Music will provide students with the opportunity to expand on their musical skills and equip them to be successful musicians. The course will focus on essential tools for musicians, including music theory, aural skills, composition, listening and analysis, and performance. Students will study and perform music from a wide range of styles and will have opportunities to compose music using instruments and composing software on the College’s MacBooks. They will also develop skills associated with performance preparation and practice, as well as playing in a music ensemble.

It is recommended that students be undertaking instrumental tuition lessons to help them prepare for their practical assessments, which will take place on their individual chosen instruments. Students are encouraged to join a school music ensemble to supplement their study of music. However, this is not a mandatory requirement for this subject. A list of ensembles and their rehearsal times will be made available at the start of the year.

Music (Specialist)

Summary

Line: 
Prerequisites: Selected students will be invited to join and are not required to audition. Invitations for Specialist Music will go out to high-achieving Music students in Year 9 who demonstrate excellence in instrumental skill and an aptitude for music theory. External students looking to join the program in Year 10 may need to go through an audition process.
More information: Mr Thomson (Music Teacher), Mr Kuipers (HOLA)

Background

God made music and it belongs to Him, all of it. He has graciously given us the skills and opportunities to learn music and He intends for us to engage with it in ways that honour Him. This course is designed to provide an avenue of extension for high achieving music students with additional focus on guiding them to resist the relentless lure of self-acclaim and instead consider how they can use their gifts to serve Him and others. It is centred around playing contemporary music in the group band setting and will include a compulsory after-school rehearsal once per week.

Purpose

The goal of our music program is to encourage and equip students to delight in God and serve others through a life-long enjoyment and participation of music. This goal underpins a progression of learning throughout the Year 7-12 music courses and informs the trajectory of the year 9 Specialist Music elective.

Course Description

As part of this course students will explore the history of contemporary western music. They will learn songwriting skills and will learn to play a wide range of musical genres in their band groups. Students will be challenged to pursue genuine excellence in a fun and joyful environment and will have the opportunity to participate in rewarding performance experiences.

Specialist Sport

Summary

Line: Two
More information: Mr de Bruyn

Background

This course suits students that have an interest in sport and wish to develop greater understanding of sporting concepts. It particularly serves those students who are interested in Physical Education Studies in Years 11-12.

Purpose
  • To focus on developing advanced skills in key sports throughout the course.
  • To gain knowledge and understanding of the strategies and tactics used to compete with excellence in sport.
  • To develop coaching and umpiring skills.
  • To be able to identify and manage the common injuries which may occur as a result of sport.
  • To establish a pathway for those interested in studying Physical Education Studies in Year 11.
Course Description

The Specialist Sport course seeks to encourage students to persevere with developing and finetuning their skills in physical activity. It is predominantly a practical subject with a theory component. The theory component will focus on the rules and strategies and game plays of sport. It will also cover the injury management of common injuries to sport. Students will practice umpiring and coaching with a goal to achieving official certification at the end of each semester. The practical component will seek to develop students’ skills in Rehoboth’s core sports.

Students must wear sports sneakers (no flat canvas shoes) and sports uniform in each lesson.

TESLA (Technology, Engineering, and Science Learning Academy)

Summary

Line: One
More information: Mr Taylor (HOLA)

Background

Students who have an interest in Science, Mathematics, Design, and Arts and like to apply principles from each field of knowledge to solve real world problems will enjoy TESLA, which is based on the principles of STEM/STEAM. This course will build on some of the skills learnt in TESLA 9, however, it is not a pre-requisite.

Purpose

TESLA represents an integrated approach to learning that reflects the integrated nature of God’s creation. It brings together students’ understanding from multiple disciplines to engage them in developing culture — with a focus on technology — that contributes to shalom. 

Skills like programming, robotics, and design process are not learnt and developed for the sake of the skills themselves, rather, they are important to the development of Kingdom citizens who are equipped to engage with God’s world and with the culture around them. TESLA provides one avenue for this at Rehoboth. Technologies are shaping us, whether we are aware of it or not, TESLA aims to equip students to shape rather than be shaped.

This course will also introduce students to the wide array of job opportunities in the STEM field and provide opportunity to compete with other schools in designing innovative solutions to real-world problems.

Course Description

In Semester 1 students will prepare for and compete in the Robocup Australia competition in either the maze or the line rescue missions. This competition will challenge their ability to design, engineer, and program an autonomous Lego Mindstorm robot. We will also take part in Game Change Awards, a design process competition that engages students in problem solving, prototyping, and presentation of a solution.

Semester 2 will focus on the First Lego League Robotics competition with the potential for taking part in the First Tech Challenge. This is an international competition that aims to equip students with coding, robotics, and engineering skills, whilst also encouraging students to engage with problems in their community. Each year the project tackles a current issue in our communities. There are three components to this competition:

  1. Teamwork and core values
  2. Robot design and programming
  3. Project

Visual Arts

Summary

Line: Three
More information: Mr Kuipers

Background

Students in Year 9 Visual Arts explored different aspects of drawing, painting, printmaking, graphic design, and ceramics in order to create individual works of art. Students intending to study Visual Arts in Year 11 are strongly recommended to select this course in Year 10.

Purpose

Developing an appreciation of the arts comes from not only creating art works but also studying the art from other cultures and times as well as our own. This course has three purposes:

  1. Students will be provided with opportunities to extend their skills in solving artistic problems to create both two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of art, while exploring a variety of methods and materials in order to do so.
  2. Students will be introduced to the major art movements of the 20th century to learn about the characteristics of each style as well as to become familiar with some famous artists, both Australian and international, associated with each art movement. This component of the course requires some degree of literacy skills beyond that normally associated with the practical nature of a Visual Arts course.
  3.  Students will learn to examine, interpret and evaluate art works with a special emphasis on a Christian perspective.
Course Description

We will review the ‘elements’ of art (colour, line, tone, texture, shape, space, and pattern) to create both two- and three-dimensional art works which have a focus on one of the elements, in particular. At the same time, we will examine art works by famous artists to explore their use of the elements of art and how art has changed over time. We will include a special look at the art work of Christian artists. Students will create drawings, paintings, collages, prints, graphic designs and ceramic artworks.

Visual Communication

Summary

Line: Two
More information: Mr Kuipers

Background

Parents and students should be aware before selecting Visual Communication that an extra amount of self-discipline and maturity is required from students in this subject. Students will work with expensive equipment in various locations on and off campus and will not be directly supervised at all times.

Purpose

This course will encourage students to use their God-given creativity to capture and manipulate images, both moving and still. Students will learn to appreciate the beauty of God’s world and how to create work that tells a story.

Course Description

Students will learn how to use various digital image recording devices through a project-based learning approach. Students will develop skills in shot selection, composition, and digital manipulation to create quality still and motion pictures. The course will also look at other forms of visual communication.

Some additional resources may need to be purchased or costs paid for off-campus activities.