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Year 11-12 Course Manual

Introduction

Welcome to Senior Secondary

Years 11-12 are a new, exciting phase of schooling for our students. They create the pathways to further learning beyond Rehoboth Christian College.

The Senior Secondary years are characterised by increased responsibility and privileges for students as they emerge into young adults. Students choose what they will study and consider how they will direct their lives in line with God’s plans for them.

Our Rehoboth students are encouraged to strive for excellence. Excellence is not about achieving an award or a particular score; it is about being the best that you can be. Students are investing in their future. The greater the investment, the better the return they can expect. At Rehoboth, we believe in having a positive and proactive approach by encouraging each student to achieve their personal best; to find their purpose and destiny in God; and to make a difference in the world in which they live.

The transition from Year 10 to Year 11 is a major step in a student’s Secondary education. Students can specialise in the course that interests them most and aim towards their future destination. It is important that informed decisions are made, where students’ aptitudes, achievements and interests are considered. Other things like the School Curriculum and Standards Authority (SCSA) requirements for Secondary graduation, and the selection criteria for universities and other providers also need to be considered.

It is important that students are realistically aware of their own capabilities and the career options they might consider before selecting their courses.

To be successful in Years 11-12, students need to have a healthy balance between time with God, schoolwork, fitness, sleep, and other interests. Being committed to doing their best and setting attainable goals is important in line with completing assessments, set homework, and study. Coming up with a plan – and following it – are two key ingredients for success.

For specific assistance in careers, please see our VET Coordinator Mr Blennerhassett, or Mr Vasquez (Head of Students, Years 10-12). They are available to assist students with goal setting, understanding university entrance requirements, WACE requirements, and graduation along with Year 12 references, examinations, accreditation, scholarships, disseminating Year 11-12 information, and coordination with SCSA.

Other reliable sources of information can be accessed through the internet, by attending Open Days, and by speaking to teachers.

Mrs M Louwen
Principal (Kenwick 7-12)

About this Manual

This manual has been designed to enable parents to talk to their children about their work on a regular basis. It will help parents to know what subjects their child is studying.

There will be an opportunity to discuss the teaching curriculum at a ‘Meet the Teachers’ evening for Year 7-12 in Term 1, Week 3.

If you have any questions as you go through this manual, please contact the Head of Students for Years 10-12 Students, Mr J Vasquez, or the Year 11-12 Form teachers straight away. We are more than happy to talk through any of the questions or concerns that you may have.

Heads of Learning Areas (HOLAs)

Area

Teacher

Email

Head of Christian Studies and VET

Mr Murray

cmurray@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of English

Mrs Erispe

herispe@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Health and Physical Education

Mr de Bruyn

ndebruyn@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Humanities

Mrs Erispe

herispe@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Mathematics

Miss Smoker

msmoker@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Science

Mr Taylor

ptaylor@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Head of Technology and the Arts

Mr Kuipers

skuipers@rehoboth.wa.edu.au

Enrolling in Year 11

General Requirements

Students wishing to enrol at Rehoboth for Year 11 must be enrolled in and studying six courses (or equivalent) in each semester. All students must study one of the following:

  • English, English as an Additional Language/Dialect, or Literature
  • At least one List A course and List B course. If you wish to compete for special SCSA awards at the end of Year 12 you will need to study at least two courses form each list.
  • if you wish to gain an ATAR, you must study a minimum of four ATAR courses in which you intend to sit the external assessment or exam at the end of 2022.
  • if you are uncertain about your tertiary aspirations or your academic performance in Year 10 indicates that you may find the ATAR pathway particularly challenging should consider enrolling in a Certificate II (or higher) course (or a General course for 2022 graduates) in addition to your ATAR courses. Note that several Certificates are two-year courses.

Other Course-Specific Criteria

If you wish to enrol in Language courses, you will need to be interviewed by Mrs Anggadjaja.

If you wish to enrol in Background and Second Language courses you must meet strict entry requirements. Applications for these courses need to be completed and endorsed by the College before being lodged with SCSA. Your enrolment in these courses will only be confirmed when written advice is provided by SCSA. The application form, stating the deadlines for submission, is available from SCSA website.

Ideally, students who select Chemistry ATAR and/or Physics ATAR will also need to select a Mathematics ATAR subject.

If you wish to enrol in the VET program you will need to be interviewed by the VET Coordinator.

Prerequisites

Many subjects offered at Rehoboth have a specific prerequisite. This is usually expressed as a grade or percentage achieved on your Year 10 Semester 1 Report.

Prerequisites are designed to assist you in the process of selecting appropriate subjects for Years 11-12. They are a minimum level required for entry into subjects and attempt to ensure that you have a sufficient background knowledge for a particular subject.

Prerequisites are based on the degree of difficulty of the Year 11 course and the kind of background that you will need to be successful in that course. You should check course descriptions carefully to ensure that you have met the prerequisite.

If you have not met the prerequisites for a course, you are not eligible to enrol in that course. These prerequisites are a good indication of your likelihood of succeeding in a certain course. Students who do not meet prerequisites rarely cope with the course, even if they are prepared to work hard or have extra tutoring. You cannot expect to be able to cope with a subject such as Maths Methods ATAR Unit 1 and 2 if they have only achieved a C grade in Year 10 Maths.

Prerequisites will usually refer to grades achieved in your Semester 1 report. However, if you achieve the prerequisite grades in your Semester 2 (end of year) report, you may be allowed to transfer subjects at this point. Prerequisites also exist in many university and some Training WA courses.

Enrolment in all courses is dependent on you gaining the signature of the HOLA and the subject teacher on your Course Selection Form. You must be signed into your course choices by both to ensure that the course prerequisites have been met.

If you do not meet prerequisites and still wish to be considered for entry into a course, you must arrange an interview with your parents and the HOLA. You should also be aware that if you begin to experience difficulties in the course and cannot continue, the choice of an alternative course will be limited, if at all possible, as other courses may already be full.

If you have achieved just below the prerequisites for one subject, you may be permitted to enrol, if the poor performance was for an identifiable reason (e.g. health). If you did not have the necessary grades in multiple subjects you will not be accepted.

Changing Selections

If you wish to make changes to your course selections after the Course  Selection Form has been submitted, will need to complete a Course Change Form, which they can obtain from the Administration Office, and discuss this with the Head of Students. All requests must be accompanied by a letter from the parent.

Note that there are cut-off dates after which a new subject cannot be commenced. In 2022 this date will be on Friday 4 March, Week 5 of Term 1. After this date, students cannot pick up a new course.

Students who do need to change courses should only do so for urgent reasons and will need to catch up on all course requirements and missed assessments to be eligible to receive a grade in the new course at the end of the year.

Foundation Units

If you have not demonstrated the minimum standard in the OLNA literacy component you are eligible to enrol in the List A English Foundation course.

If you who have not demonstrated the minimum standard in the OLNA numeracy component you are eligible to enrol in the List B Mathematics Foundation course.

Once you have successfully met the literacy and numeracy standards, you will be transferred into the General English and Maths courses.

Course Selection forms

Year 11 and Year 12 students need to complete the 2021 Subject Selection form and return it by Friday 27 August 2021.

All Year 11 students must choose one subject on each of the six grid lines.

You are not required to study the same subjects in Year 11 and Year 12, as these are separate courses; however, to study most Year 12 level courses, you will need to complete the relevant Year 11 course – especially in the case of Unit 3 Unit 4 ATAR courses.

When completing the Course Selection Form you should only select courses for which you are eligible.

All courses are offered with the understanding that courses that do not attract a reasonable number of students will not run. Similarly, in some courses, there may be more students wanting to do the courses than the number of places available.

As with all schools, facilities (e.g. in Food Science and Technology) may also limit the number of available places. Preference will be given to students who meet the prerequisites and submit their Course Selection Form by the due date.

Students who do not meet prerequisites are not guaranteed a place in a course if they successfully meet prerequisites at a later date.

Enrolling in Year 12

Prerequisities

A minimum C grade at the end of Year 11 is the prerequisite for continuing that subject at Year 12 level.

If you are at risk of not achieving the WACE, you will be advised to reassess your course pathway. This may mean transferring from an ATAR course to a General course or VET qualification.

Year 12 students on an ATAR pathway and seeking university entrance must study at least four courses at Unit 3 and Unit 4 level and are typically advised to select five.

Year 12 Study Class

In Year 12, it may be possible for students enrolled in at least four ATAR courses (i.e. a university entrance course) to select a total of five subjects, after approval by the Principal. This allows one subject line to be used for scheduled private study.

Course Selection Forms

Year 11 and Year 12 students need to complete the 2021 Subject Selection form and return it by Friday 11 September 2020.

All Year 11 students must choose one subject on each of the six grid lines.

You are not required to study the same subjects in Year 11 and Year 12, as these are separate courses; however, to study most Year 12 level courses, you will need to complete the relevant Year 11 course – especially in the case of Unit 3 Unit 4 ATAR courses.

When completing the Course Selection Form you should only select courses for which you are eligible.

All courses are offered with the understanding that courses that do not attract a reasonable number of students will not run. Similarly, in some courses, there may be more students wanting to do the courses than the number of places available.

As with all schools, facilities (e.g. in Food Science and Technology) may also limit the number of available places. Preference will be given to students who meet the prerequisites and submit their Course Selection Form by the due date.

Students who do not meet prerequisites are not guaranteed a place in a course if they successfully meet prerequisites at a later date.

The Bible tells us the best way to live and once you put God’s framework on problems, either you realise that they’re not problems anymore or you gain an insight into how we should live best with them.

Clare Steele (Compassion Australia CEO)

Compassion Stories 2020 Magazine

The Senior Secondary Program

Coping with Transition

Students will be experiencing transition this year as they move into the Secondary School.

With change can come uncertainty and anxiety. Whenever we are in a new situation, there is a period where we are learning and adapting.

Adapting is about making choices and developing a set of new routines that will help you to cope with the new demands.

Some tips are:

Ask Questions
Ask lots and lots of questions. If you are unsure about something, don’t sit in silence – ask a question.

If you feel uncomfortable asking the teacher directly, ask a friend or ask the teacher after class.

Be aware, there are probably many other students with the same question, and they will probably be thankful that someone asked the question they also had.

Find a Buddy
It is much easier if you have someone to talk to about what you are both experiencing.

A buddy is someone you can check things with, even just someone to listen to you when you want to moan and groan or celebrate.

You don’t have to specifically say ‘Let’s be buddies’, but look out for a like-minded person so that you can help each other along the way.

Consolidate
When you are learning new things, or have lots of new information heading your way, it’s important to take time to consolidate.

This could be explaining what you are learning to someone like your parents or buddy, or it could be writing a short list or summary of what you have been told so you don’t forget it.

Have a Positive Attitude
Your attitude can make a world of difference to the type of experiences you have during any transition.

Reflect on your thoughts. Are they negative or positive?

You can start to take control and direct the way you think about a situation and this in turn will change how you feel.

For example, if something goes wrong and you notice you’re thinking something like, ‘What an idiot, I can’t believe I did that,’ catch yourself and say, ‘Everyone makes mistakes. At least now I know what I need to do for the next time’.

Develop the habit of positive self-talk, rather than running yourself down.

Aim for Your Personal Best
Don’t compare yourself to other people. Aim for your own personal best.

Strive to do the best you can, to learn, to grow, and develop. We all have different skills and strengths and sometimes these aren’t always evident in the school situation.

Focus on being the best student you can be and celebrate your strengths and gifts,in whatever arena you have them.

Chaplain
You should always talk to someone and tell them how you feel.

The Year 11-12 Form teachers, Pastoral Care Group Mentors, and Mr Blennerhassett (Chaplain) are here to help.

A Biblical Framework for Years 11-12

A Christian education acknowledges that all of life is part of God’s creation and, as such, all subject areas will be studied from a Christian perspective.

The following diagram shows the framework which forms the basis of our curriculum planning:

Our teachers are Christians who build the curriculum on Biblical foundations while still fulfilling State and National curriculum requirements.

As we teach from a Biblical perspective, we believe that we present God’s world in a coherent and connected whole – created by our one creator God.

Students will be encouraged to respond to their learning in the way in which they treat others, in the way they encourage and respect others, their focus on sharing Christ, and by doing their personal best in all things.

Students will be encouraged to develop honesty and integrity in order to be ‘salt and light’ in the world.

Students will be encouraged to respond to what they learn. Just as the Bible describes that faith without action is dead (Jam 2:17), so too knowledge, without a response or change in attitude, is incomplete.

As Christian teachers, we aim to fulfil the Biblical commands to go and make disciples and to train children in the way in which they should go (Matt 28:19 and Prv 22:6).

What Does 21st Century Learning Look Like?

Our goal is to develop four essential skills sets that student can expect to develop in a 21st century learning environment. These are:

  • Communication: The ability to effectively share thoughts, questions, ideas and solutions
  • Collaboration: The ability to recognise the God-given talents of others and be able to work together to achieve shared goals.
  • Critical Thinking: Looking at problems, tasks, and issues in fresh ways by linking ideas and concepts across disciplines to find solutions.
  • Creativity: Trying new approaches to achieve solution (innovation and invention).

Classrooms in the 21st century are flexible, interactive learning environments. They are rich in learning materials and resources.

In this sort of environment, there are different spaces set aside to meet a variety of learning needs, including areas for group work and discussions, areas creating, places to study and think alone, and outdoor spaces to use. Our Library Resource Centre (LRC) has been refurbished to take this into account.

The classroom is also filled with all kinds of learning tools: mobile devices, art supplies, low- and high-tech materials for do-it-yourself projects, equipment for tinkering, and other materials as determined by the unique needs of the learners.

Education in the 21st century offers a huge variety of learning options: direct instruction via a teacher; face-to-face or virtual peer collaborations; and through local or virtual access to experts and professionals.

Students are not dependent on the teacher alone for content-specific knowledge and can be the primary agents of their education with access to an almost limitless number of online resources.

Learning should not be thought of only as memorising subject-specific facts and concepts in a vacuum, but rather as cross-disciplinary and in real-world contexts.

In a 21st-century learning environment, students are not just consumers of content, but should be given opportunities to have a voice and to contribute to the real world by creating content as part of their learning processes.

Expectations of Year 11-12 Students

Below are the minimum requirements which students are expected to follow, so they can work with their teachers in an environment which helps support learning and the development of good working habits.

Christian Attitude, Values, and Character Behaviour Expectations
We respect God, others and ourselves: This means:

  • Every student has the right to feel safe and to be safe
  • We treat all things with care
  • We respect the role of students to learn and of teachers to teach
  • We listen and use positive words to solve problems
  • Students represent the College appropriately by wearing the uniform correctly.

Classroom Rules

  • Students will bring to class at the start of each lesson everything which is needed for the lesson.
  • Students will not distract other students from completing work and other tasks.
  • Students will give total focus to the teacher when the teacher is speaking.
  • Students will always show courtesy and respect to the teacher and to each other.
  • Everyone has the right to work in a peaceful, courteous learning environment.
  • Students will take responsibility to keep up with class work and to keep their books and files in an organised manner.
  • Students will submit homework on the due date unless an extension has been requested and granted before the due date.

Outdoor Rules

  • Students are not to be in the classroom without the teacher’s permission or presence.
  • All rubbish is to be deposited in the bins provided.
  • Students are not permitted to leave the campus grounds.
  • If you have achieved your driver’s license, you need to submit a Permission to Drive in the College Form. You will also need to hand your car keys in to the Administration Office at the beginning of the school day, to be collected at the end of the day.

What is Success in Years 11-12 Based On?

However you define success in Senior Secondary, it will depend on a number of principles that need to be practiced consistently. These are:

Approach
How you approach your studies will make a big difference. This would mean:

  • Being clear about the subjects you want to study and understand the structure of how ATAR works
  • Understand the requirements for achievement of the WACE
  • Have an end goal written out (such as a grade or target score), but also have daily goals that you are consistently practising
  • Know the syllabus and the assessment outline of your subjects
  • Expect an increase in workload
  • Revise early for exams
  • Textbooks and other materials for your courses are always available for use
  • Hand in your work on time

Attendance
Your attendance at school has a big effect on your learning. It provides opportunity for participation and learning.

Without a doubt, your likelihood to do well in Senior Secondary increases with your regular attendance. You should aim for 100% attendance.

Study, Home, and Work Commitments
Your time commitments need to be balanced and prioritised.

You will need to practice self-direction in your organisation of notes, revision, exam preparation, and study.

A student studying five or six university pathway courses typically will need a minimum of 15 hours per week for homework and study. This commitment needs to be viewed in the bigger context of rest and personal commitments.

The last two years of Secondary School is a good challenge to learn how to practice practical time management. Ask your teachers for advise on how to do this.

Choosing Your Courses
When choosing your courses please take note of the following:

  • Course prerequisites: These are the marks that determine your likelihood of success in each subject in Years 11-12, based on historical evidence of students doing the subjects. Past success is an important factor to consider.
  • Prerequisites for further study: If you have a particular career, university, or TAFE course in mind, please check any prerequisitie requirements carefully. Ask for assistance from the VET Coordinator or Head of Students.
  • Choose wisely: It is unwise to base your decisions for subject choices on factors such as what your friends have chosen or a favourite teacher. Your friend’s aspirations will be different to yours and there is no guarantee you will be placed in a subject taught by a teacher you want.

What is the WACE?

Most students in Years 11-12 are working towards the achievement of their Western Australian Certificate Education (WACE). The WACE is a certificate that demonstrates significant achievement over Years 11 and 12.

Achievement of the WACE acknowledges that at the end of compulsory schooling, students have achieved or exceeded the required minimum standards in an educational program that has suitable breadth and depth.

A Western Australian Statement of Student Achievement (WASSA) is issued to all Year 12 students who complete any study that contributes towards their WACE. It lists all courses and programs students have completed in Years 11-1

Achieving the WACE

Students graduating in 2022 must:

  • demonstrate a minimum standard (OLNA Band 8) of literacy (reading and writing) and a minimum standard of numeracy, and
  • complete a minimum of twenty units (or equivalents), and
  • complete at least four Year 12 ATAR courses, or
  • complete at least five Year 12 General courses and/or ATAR course (or equivalent), or
  • complete a Certificate II (or higher) VET qualification in combination with ATAR, General, or Foundation courses

Students may enrol in a mix of ATAR courses, General courses, VET programs, or endorsed programs to achieve a WACE, but there is a limit to the number of VET programs and endorsed programs that students can choose.

In Year 11 all students study six courses (or equivalent) – a total of twelve semester-long course units. Most students will continue with these six courses in Year 12.

Over the two years, students will be able to complete 24 course units or the equivalent. Each course has four units – Unit 1 and Unit 2 (Year 11 units) and Unit 3 and Unit 4 (Year 12 units). At Rehoboth, all courses are paired as the subjects are graded concurrently.

Generally, those students intending to enrol in TAFE may study a mix of General course units, ATAR course units, and VET programs. Those aiming for university entrance directly from school will complete at least four ATAR courses in Year 12.

WACE courses are grouped into List A subjects (Arts, English, Languages, Social Sciences) and List B subjects (Mathematics, Science, Technology) subjects. Students studying for a WACE are required to select at least one Year 12 course from each of List A and List B.

A student who withdraws from a VET course before completing the qualification will not receive a course unit credit for that academic year. Permission for a student to change courses is a school decision; however, for a student to achieve course unit credits, a change can only be made:

  • early in Year 12, before the cut-off date set by SCSA, or
  • in Year 11 after the completion of Unit 1, or
  • at the end of Year 11 after the completion of Unit 2.

To qualify for the WACE in 2022 a student must:

  • complete twenty WACE course units over ten subjects, or acceptable alternatives such as Endorsed Programs and Certificate courses
  • complete at least one pair of Year 12 course units from both List A and List B (see below)
  • achieve a minimum of fourteen ‘C’ grades in Year 11 and Year 12 (seven subjects), with a minimum of six Year 12 ‘C’ grades (three subjects) in Unit 3 and Unit 4 courses (VET courses and Endorsed Programs may count as equivalents)
  • achieve a minimum OLNA Band 8 in literacy and numeracy
  • complete a minimum of ten Year 12 units (five subjects) or equivalent.

Credit for Completion of VET Qualifications
The table below shows the credit students receive towards their WACE for VET qualifications completed under specific conditions:

Completed Qualification

Total Equivalence

Year 11 Credit Allocation (Unit Equivalents)

Year 12 Credit Allocation (Unit Equivalents)

Satisfies the Minimum VET Requirement for WACE in 2021

Certificate I

2 units

2

0

No

Certificate II

4 units

2

2

Yes

Certificate III (Partial)

4 units

2

2

Yes

Certificate III or Higher (Full)

6 units

2

4

Yes

Literacy and Numeracy

There are two parts to demonstrating competence in literacy and numeracy.

Firstly, you are required to complete two Year 11 English units and a pair of Year 12 English units.

Secondly, you must demonstrate that you have met the minimum standard for literacy and numeracy. This is based on skills regarded as essential for individuals to meet the demands of everyday life and work. You can demonstrate the minimum standard by:

  • achieving a minimum Band 8 in Year 9 NAPLAN Reading, Writing, and Numeracy tests, or
  • successfully completing the Online Literacy Numeracy Assessment (OLNA)

The OLNA is compulsory for any student who has not already qualified in one or more of the components through Year 9 NAPLAN and want to achieve the WACE.

You will have up to six opportunities (two per year) between Year 10 and Year 12 to demonstrate the literacy and numeracy minimum standard.

There are three OLNA assessment components:

  • One 50 minute, 45-item multiple choice Reading test
  • One 50 minute, 45-item multiple choice Numeracy test
  • One 60 minute, extended Writing response of up to 600 words

If you have a language background other than English and have arrived from overseas in the past year you may be able to delay sitting the OLNA.

Disability provisions are available for students with significant conditions which may severely limit their capacity to participate in the OLNA. These students, after discussions between parents and the school, may choose not to sit the OLNA. However, these students will not be to achieve the WACE.

Students in either category should discuss their options with the Head of Students.

School Leaving Age

Students must stay in school or training or approved work (or in a combination of approved options) until the end of the year in which they turn 17, or until they satisfy the minimum requirements for graduation.

If students are intending to leave full-time schooling, parents/legal guardians must fill in a Notice of Arrangements Form, which is available from the Administration Office and send it to:

Participation Unit
Department of Education
151 Royal Street
East Perth WA 6004

List A and List B Subjects

WACE courses are grouped into two lists:

List A Subjects

  • [ENG] English (includes ATAR, General, and Foundation English)
  • [GEO] Geography (ATAR)
  • [IND] Indonesian: Second Language (includes ATAR and General)
  • [MUS] Music (includes ATAR and General)
  • [HIM] Modern History (ATAR)
  • [LIT] Literature (ATAR)
  • [VAR] Visual Arts (General)

List B Subjects

  • [CHE] Chemistry (ATAR)
  • [FST] Food Science and Technology (General)
  • [HBY] Human Biology (ATAR)
  • [MAT] Mathematics (includes ATAR Applications, Methods, Essential General, and Foundation)
  • [MAS] Mathematics Specialist (ATAR)
  • [PES] Physical Education Studies (includes ATAR and General)
  • [PHY] Physics (ATAR)

ATAR and General Courses

Courses units/programs from the following list contribute to the achievement of a WACE:

  • ATAR
  • General
  • Foundation
  • VETfS courses delivered by TAFE (while at school)
  • VETiS courses at school and endorsed programs such as ADWPL and ADOEP

If you complete Year 12 and do not complete the course requirements to achieve an ATAR you will need to achieve a minimum of a Certificate II qualification; however, students graduating in 2021 do not have this requirement.

There are four types of courses developed by SCSA offered at Rehoboth:

ATAR Course Units
These are for students who are aiming to enrol in a university course after school. They are designed and examined by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority (SCSA).
Your results are used in the calculation of an Australian Tertiary Admissions Ranking (ATAR). This ranking is used to determine eligibility for university entrance.
Students will need to study a minimum of four ATAR courses in Year 11 and four ATAR courses in Year 12 to be eligible for an ATAR.

In Year 12 students will study more difficult unit pairs (Units 3 and 4). 50% of a student’s final score in an ATAR course is determined at the school level and 50% is determined by the externally assessed exam. These courses are examined by SCSA and contribute to the achievement of an ATAR.

General Course Units
These are school-based courses with no external exam. Tests and/or examinations may include Externally Set Tasks.

General courses are designed for students who wish to enter further training or the workforce. General courses include Foundation and Preliminary courses.

Foundational Course Units
These courses are designed for students who have not achieved the literacy or numeracy minimum standard.

Vocational Education and Training (VET)
These are nationally accredited programs which are designed for students who wish to enter further training or the workforce.

Students gain unit equivalence towards the WACE if the courses are fully completed. Up to 40% of a student’s overall program can be made up of VET courses.

Externally Set Tasks

Students who are enrolled in a General or Foundation course must complete an Externally Set Task. If you do not sit or make a genuine attempt, that pair of units will not contribute to the calculation of the achievement standard.

Endorsed Programs

Endorsed Programs address areas of learning not covered by WACE courses.

Examples of Endorsed Programs include:

  • Authority Developed Workplace Learning (ADWPL) for those in the workplace
  • Authority Developed Off-campus Enrichment Program (ADOEP) for students who go on mission trips
  • Cadets WA
  • performance in school productions
  • independently administered exams in music, speech, and drama.

Endorsed Programs can be delivered in a variety of settings by schools, community organisations, training organisations, and workplaces. Endorsed Programs may replace up to a maximum of two Year 11 and two Year 12 course units needed to achieve the WACE.

Students should discuss any of these potential Endorsed Programs with the VET Coordinator.

Certificates and Awards

Certificate of Excellence
Certificates of Excellence (ATAR courses) are awarded to eligible candidates who are in the top 0.5% of candidates in each ATAR course examination, based on the examination mark.

Certificates of Merit and Distinction
Certificates of Merit and Certificates of Distinction recognise student achievement in the WACE and are dependent on the degree of difficulty of the courses and programs undertaken, together with your level of achievement.

These awards are based solely on the grades awarded to students by their schools. A Certificate of Merit or a Certificate of Distinction is based on the number of points accrued using your best twenty Year 11 and 12 units.

Each A grade in an ATAR course gains 20 points, while an ATAR B gains 18 points. An A grade in a General course gains 18 points.

To achieve these awards you must gain:

  • Certificate of Merit = 150-189 points
  • Certificate of Distinction = 190-200 points.

Names of award-winning students are acknowledged in The West Australian.

School Assessments

Grades and School Marks

To be assigned a grade in a WACE course, you must have had the opportunity to complete the education and assessment programs for the unit (unless there are exceptional circumstances that are acceptable to the College).

Teachers of Year 11 and Year 12 students submit results to SCSA at the end of the year based on assessments such as classroom tests, in-class work, assignments, practical work, and exams.

Students will receive a letter grade ABCD or E for each course they have completed, except for Preliminary (P) units, which are not graded. The notation of U can be used for non-final year students who do not complete the assessment program. Only students who will be returning the following year to complete the assessment program can be awarded a U notation.

Students will also receive a school mark from 0 to 100 for each unit pair of an ATAR or General course (except Preliminary) that they complete.

Students will receive a Completed status instead of a grade for VET courses. The notation Completed is equivalent to a C grade. If you do not complete the requirements of a VET qualification you will be awarded a U notation (as above) and WACE credit may contribute as VET unit equivalence for the partial completion of a Certificate III or higher, depending on how much of the course you have finished.

Student achievement is recorded as Completed or Not Completed. Completion of a Certificate III or higher is determined by the College according to criteria set by SCSA.

Adjustment of Grades and School Marks

During the school year, SCSA uses several procedures to ensure that the grades awarded by different schools are comparable.

Grades assigned by Rehoboth are based on SCSA’s grade descriptions for each course. The grades you receive are provisional until confirmed by SCSA.

The College is required to advise you in writing if any changes are made to your provisional grades during the approval process. However, SCSA adjusts the grades assigned by a school only in exceptional circumstances.

Externally Set Tasks

An Externally Set Task is a common task that all students enrolled in a General course and a Foundation course will do in Semester 1 of Year 12.

The task is set by SCSA, completed by students under test conditions, and is worth 15% of the final mark for that course.

Externally Set Tasks are marked by your teacher using a marking key provided by SCSA. Preliminary courses do not include Externally Set Tasks.

Review of School Assessments

Schools must inform students in writing of their grades by a date specified annually by SCSA (usually in late October).

If you believe that your grade or school mark is incorrect, you should make a request in writing to the Head of Students for a review of your result.

Authenticity of Work

It is imperative that all work you submit for school assessment is your own.

Any material that is included in your work that is not your own must be acknowledged and cited appropriately.

Our Assessment Policy outlines the penalties for submitting another’s work as your own. This is available to all students via SEQTA Learn. All the work you submit as part of the WACE practical component (ATAR and General Units 3 and 4), must also be your own work. Any material included in your work that is not your own must be acknowledged and cited appropriately.

Two great lies have been promoted in our culture during the past twenty years:
1. If you work hard enough, you can be anything you want to be.
2. You can be the best in the world.
Success, defined as being the master of one’s own destiny, has become an idol […] As Christians, we have a mission that our Lord expects us to accomplish right now. We are called to steward all we have been given while we wait for our Saviour’s return.

Hugh Whelchel

The Biblical Meaning of Success

Tertiary Entrance

What is the ATAR?

The ATAR is a rank used by universities as a selection mechanism. It takes into account the number of students who sit WACE examinations in a given year and the number of people of Year 12 school leaving age in the total population.

The Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (TEA) is used to derive your ATAR. The TEA is the sum of your best four scaled marks, taking into account any unacceptable subject combinations, and must include a List A and List B subject.

The TEA is scored out of 430 (400 for the best four subjects, plus the potential bonuses of 10% of the scaled score in LOTE, Maths Specialist, and Maths Methods which are added to the aggregate of your best four scaled scores).

Once your TEA score been calculated, it is converted into your Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR). The ATAR ranges between 0 and 99.95 – it is not a percentage. It reports your rank relative to all other students.

The ATAR takes into account the number of students who sit the WACE exams in a given year. For example, if a student has an ATAR of 96.00 it indicates that the student is in the top 4% of Year 12 school leavers for that year. An ATAR of 96 equates to a scaled average of approximately 75%. TISC then offers university places based on this ranking.

ATAR Examinations

All students who are enrolled in ATAR courses are required to sit the external exam in Year 12. All ATAR exams have written papers and some also include practical, oral, performance, or portfolio exams, depending on the subject.

If you do not sit, or do not make a genuine attempt in the WACE examination, that pair of units will not contribute to the calculation of the achievement standard.

SCSA sets, administers, and marks ATAR examinations for ATAR Units 3 and 4 in all courses.

Each ATAR examination assesses the specific content, understandings, knowledge, and skills described in the syllabus for the course (a pair of units). Each syllabus is available from SCSA. These are copied and issued to students in the first week of each unit.

The practical ATAR examinations are held in the first week of the Term 3 school holidays, on weekends, the Queen’s Birthday public holiday and during the second and third weeks of Term 4.

The written examinations start on the first Monday in November. When you enrol in a Year 12 ATAR course, you will be automatically enrolled to sit the ATAR examination in that course.

If you are applying for university admission, you should check that your course selections meet the entry requirements. University admission information is available from TISC.

Special examination arrangements may be made if you have permanent or temporary disabilities that may disadvantage you in an examination situation. If you believe you may be entitled to this provision, you should discuss this with the Head of Students at the start of each year, so that these arrangements can also be applied to your Rehoboth Semester 1 and 2 exams.

Calculating the ATAR

To calculate the ATAR, the school assessment and WACE exam results are combined.

The ATAR is based on the best four subject average (the TEA), taking scaling into account, and including a List A and List B subject. It can be estimated by using the TISC ATAR Calculator.

ATAR

Average of four subjects

TEA Score (2018)

Minimum Entries

65.10

52

208

 

70.40

54.75

219

Curtin, Murdoch, ECU

75.45

57.5

230

 

80.45

60.75

243

UWA

85.30

64.5

258

 

89.90

69

276

 

94.55

75

300

 

95.55

76.75

307

Curtin Scholarship

 

Tertiary Entrance

Students wishing to enter university will normally need to:

  • qualify for the WACE
  • demonstrate competence in English
  • satisfy any course prerequisites
  • obtain the ATAR required by the course

A TAFE Certificate IV is also an entry pathway into some university courses. If you think you may struggle to cope, especially with exams, this may be a viable option.

It is worth noting that those with rigorous academic courses at school are often more likely to succeed with their university studies.

All universities offer alternative entry pathways. If you think you may struggle to cope with these entry requirements, especially exams, a Certificate IV may be a viable option. Some universities also offer pre-entry programs from which university can be accessed:

These pathways can usually be completed in six months and may be the best option for a student who may struggle with an ATAR university entry. You may also be able to apply for Semester 2 intake for some courses. Each university’s website has full details, and TISC regularly updates its website with tertiary entry information.

WACE

Universities require students to demonstrate breadth of study. You are best able to address this requirement by qualifying for the WACE.

Competence in English

You must achieve your preferred university’s requirement for English Language Competence by:

  • achieving a scaled mark of at least 50 in ATAR English, Literature or EALD, or
  • meeting university-specific concessions where a scaled mark of 50 has not been achieved (see below), or
  • demonstrating competence through the Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT). 

You can find out more information about university concessions and alternative admission pathways by visiting the websites of each university or via TISC and SCSA.

Course Prerequisites

Many university courses specify that certain subjects must be undertaken in Year 12 as background knowledge is needed to be able to apply. Normally, a scaled mark of at least 50 in the specified ATAR courses is required.

It is worth noting that the courses offered at Rehoboth will fulfil the prerequisites of virtually all university courses, and highly specialised courses are not often required for university entrance.

Sufficiently High ATAR

TISC is responsible for the ranking of students for university entrance.

Each course result is based on 50% school assessment and 50% examinations. Statistical adjustments are made to these results through moderation and scaling.

Useful Websites

For more details and a list of the prerequisites for university courses, visit TISC or individual university website, or get a copy of the university handbooks.

Applying Interstate

If you are applying to an interstate university, check out Universities Australia for university courses and university websites.

Most states have a similar tertiary admissions centre to TISC but work out their entrance scores differently and have differing deadlines for application. It is essential that you check out the following:

State

Website

NSW or ACT

Universities Admission Centre

Queensland

Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre

South Australia or Northern Territory

South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre

Tasmania

University of Tasmania

Victoria

Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre

Vocational Education

About VET

Vocational Education and Training (VET) is a separate category that aims to train you in skills and competencies related to occupations. In some cases, you are able to complete industry training through workplace learning. The focus is on transferable work skills that will help you when you join the workforce after your schooling. 

Rehoboth offers VET options to Year 11-12 students who would benefit from this program.

VET programs can give you the opportunity to gain core skills for work and, in some cases, complete training in industry through workplace learning.

You can begin training for your career while still at school by undertaking a VET qualification. You should discuss the available VET opportunities with the VET Coordinator.

A VET qualification can contribute up to eight of the twenty units (two subjects in Year 11 and two in Year 12) that you need to achieve your WACE. If your educational program does not include four ATAR courses in Year 12 in 2020, you will need to complete a Certificate II qualification or higher to achieve your WACE (this will not be a requirement for those in Year 12 in 2021).

Onsite Vocational Education

At Rehoboth in 2021, we will offer the Certificate II Community Services (CHC22015) and Certificate II/III in Music Industry (CUA20615). These are nationally accredited courses delivered at the College under a private provider (RTO). These certificate courses incur separate fees as listed in the subject details section below.

Rehoboth also offers the endorsed unit Authority Developed Workplace Learning (ADWPL), which usually involves doing 110 hours in the workplace.

 

Offsite Vocational Education

The Vocational Education and Training delivered to School Students (VETdSS) program involves certificate courses, typically one day a week (Friday), in a program provided by a number of external providers. External providers include WA-government run TAFE and private institutions.

Tuition charges vary between providers. Generally, government TAFE courses are free or low fee-paying. Course costs from private institutions are paid by parents.

Catching up on schoolwork missed when you are offsite is strictly your responsibility if you decide to participate in the VETdSS program. This information is discussed with Year 10 and Year 11 students at the start of Term 3 and applications are due to the VET Coordinator by Wednesday 26 August. Online applications are to be submitted by the student by Monday 31 of August 2020.

You need to attach your resume, school reports from Semester 1 2020, a teacher’s reference, and any other relevant documents to support your applications.

All VET applications require a Unique Student Identifier (USI) number in order to be processed. You can create a USI here.

External providers that Rehoboth currently has ongoing Memorandums of Agreement (MOA) with include:

Study with other providers will be assessed on a case by case basis.

Eligiility

The VETdSS program is offered to current Year 11 and Year 12 students.

Several factors need to be taken into consideration when deciding who will benefit from these courses, and still be able to graduate. An interview with the VET Coordinator is required to make this assessment.

Students enrolled in VETdSS will have some periods available to catch up on their other subjects once TAFE commences where VETdSS appears on their timetable.


Extension Programs

Instrumental Music Program

Rehoboth invites students to become part of its expanding Instrumental Music Program (IMP). Learning an instrument enhances commitment, critical assessment, and time management, and also improves musical and creative skills.

Creating music gives enjoyment, a sense of achievement, and a boost to your confidence. Lessons are provided for the following instruments:

  • Clarinet
  • Drums
  • Flute
  • Guitar
  • Piano
  • Saxophone
  • Violin
  • Voice

You are strongly encouraged to join a music ensemble to further your skills on your instruments, to learn about playing in a group environment, and to engage in performances.

There is a Year 7-8 Worship Band, a Year 9-10 Worship Band, and a Year 11-12 Worship Band, in addition to our Secondary Choir.

For further details, please contact the music teacher, regarding the music ensembles, or the IMP Administration Officer, Miss Younger, regarding the program.

Emergency Services Cadets

Rehoboth’s Emergency Services Cadet Unit meets in the Gym on Thursday afternoons form 3:15pm.

The Cadets program enables young people to develop practical life skills, leadership, teamwork, and initiative. Cadets learn about the diverse nature of WA’s emergency services and develop qualities of community responsibility and service.

Rehoboth Cadets is made up of many Year 7-10 students, with Year 11-12 students taking on roles as Cadet leaders. A variety of Secondary School teachers act as Instructors.

There is no cost involved to join Cadets. Cadets are issued with a Cadet Polo Shirt and Jumper that will be worn with their Rehoboth PE shorts and sneakers. The Cadet program includes an annual camp for Cadets that regularly attend the weekly meetings.

[Excellence] is the stuff of which greatness is made. It is the difference between just getting by and soaring […] Those who pursue it do so because of what pulsates within them, not because of what others think or say or do […] Those who impact and reshape the world are the ones committed to living above the level of mediocrity

Charles R. Swindoll

Living above the Level of Mediocrity (1989 p276)

Course Index

Booklists

In Years 11-12, you will be required to purchase most of your own textbooks. Booklists for the following year are usually made available during November.

Changing Courses

You may change your course selection at any time prior to the start of the next school year. This is done by completing a new Course Selection Form and getting all the signatures required for any change – including teacher signatures of the subjects changed, the HOLA, your parents, and the Principal’s signature.

Course Change Forms can be obtained from the Administration Office. Some course changes will take place after the Semester 2 reports are issued at the end of the year, as you meet the prerequisites which were not originally met at the time the form was due.

Changes are also possible at the start of Year 11 and Year 12, but there is a SCSA cut-off date by which changes must be finalised, if picking up an entirely new course. This needs careful consideration, as catching up new course material and assignments may be required for a new course, and exams cover all the material covered.

Subject Fees

Course fees are charged as part of the school fees and are included in the family’s account.

Please take careful note of the different course fees as they vary considerably from subject to subject, especially if a Registered Training Provider (RTO) is involved.

Seminars in Christian Perspectives (Compulsory Course)

Summary

More information: Mr Kuipers (HOLA), Mr Murray

This is a compulsory two periods per week course. This is a course in Christian ethics and thinking. Teachers draw on a range of resources including materials produced by Christian Education Publications. It does not count towards graduation but is a part of the Year 11 and Year 12 course requirements at Rehoboth.

Course Overview

Year 11 topics include:

  • Bible studies
  • Historical Christianity
  • Apologetics
  • A Biblical response to gender and sexuality

Year 12 topics include:

  • Bible studies
  • Living in a self-centred world
  • A Christian view of sex
  • Historical Christianity

The course aims to help you understand the complexity of life around you, the truth of Scripture as a guide, and the necessity for Christians to think Biblically about all of life. You will be encouraged to develop Biblical perspectives on ethical and philosophical issues.

You will examine a Christian worldview which sees God as central to all things. This occurs mainly through class discussion, small group work, short reading exercises, short responses to motivating-stimulus questions, study of Bible teaching, etc.

The course is not seen as an academic one (i.e. it is not based on assignments or assessments, etc.). It is a stimulating course, and you will be challenged to think more deeply about many issues and how being a Christian means being transformed.

The allocated time may also be used for presentations from speakers from different Christian organisations. During Term 4, Year 11 students will also undertake a course in leadership development.

Seminars in Christian Perspectives is a course that is not reported on.

Senior Sport (Compulsory Course)

Summary

More information: Mr de Bruyn (HOLA)

This is a compulsory two periods per week course. This is not an assessable course and feedback in Semester Reports is limited to participation, cooperation and attitude. The course does not count towards graduation but is a part of the Year 11 and Year 12 course requirements at Rehoboth.

Course Overview

You will be expected to participate fully in order to meet the College’s general requirements for satisfactory student performance. When you are using venues outside the College, your behaviour and dress should be impeccable.

While the program followed in Senior Sport is only a limited contribution to overall fitness, it helps you find other avenues for physical activity which you can then pursue independently. After leaving school, many students continue with the sports they were first introduced to in school.

As a Christian school, we believe that it is important for you to continue to look after your physical wellbeing as well as to pursue your formal studies. The pursuit of a reasonable level of fitness is also a God-honouring responsibility of each Christian in regard to our view of the body as God’s creation and being the temple of the Holy Spirit.

You will be able to choose one Senior Sport option during Term 2. You are expected to stay with that choice for the full rotation and the entire term paid in full, as outside providers and buses will have been booked and paid for. Refunds will not be possible for days when you are absent.

Generally, a choice of sports options will be available, some with a cost involved, and some at no cost. All Year 11-12 students are expected to attend and be involved with the College’s Sports Carnivals.

Most of the sports in which you will be involved are not team sports but are sports which may be played individually or in small groups and are mainly of a recreational nature. This is for a number of reasons: the smaller student numbers in Senior Secondary years make it difficult to organise team sports, and the final years of schooling are a great opportunity to explore a range of possibilities for future recreational sports in which young people may take part.

The program may include activities such as self-defence, archery, squash, Bounce, crossfit, or bowling, but this will vary from year to year.

In 2021, Senior Sport periods will be scheduled on Fridays during Periods 6-7.

You will be expected to wear the full regular sports uniform as described in the Year 7-12 Uniform Manual (including proper blue sports shorts). There will occasionally be sports in which you may participate at outside venues where you may not need your sports uniform – crossfit and bowling are examples of this; however, you should assume that you should wear the sports uniform unless the teacher specifically gives other instructions.

Some of the choices of activities will take place at other venues. This will necessitate the hiring of buses for transport (which does add to the cost). You may not use your own vehicles for transport, as this is a duty of care and safety issue.

The course fee pays for compulsory whole-group activities, like ballroom dancing. There is a cost associated with many of the other optional activities, and parents will need to sign a form to allow students to join these activities. These will then be invoiced on the family’s accounts each term. There will be one school-based choice offered free of charge each term.

Authority Developed Workplace Learning (ADWPL)

Summary

More information: Mr Blennerhassett (VET Coordinator)
Prerequisites: Interview with the VET Coordinator and approval by the Head of Students 

Course Overview

The purpose of ADWPL is to prepare you to go out into the workplace, often in a secular environment. This is the part of your Christian walk where you learn to be ‘salt and light’ in sometimes challenging circumstances.

You are required to find a workplace learning placement before the commencement of the 2021 school year, as you will begin your work placement by Week 3 of Term 1.

ADWPL involves participating in the workplace for a minimum of 110 hours (this may be paid or unpaid work). It provides an opportunity for you to demonstrate and develop increasing knowledge, understandings, and competence in the core skills for work, often referred to as generic, transferable, or employability skills. These skills play a key role in lifelong learning. Developing competence in workplace skills assists you in gaining employment and, in the longer term, to progress within the organisation or industry area in which you are employed, and to contribute successfully to the organisation’s objectives and to the wider community.

ADWPL is an SCSA-developed endorsed program that is open to students in Year 11 and 12 in 2021. You will need to record the number of hours completed and the tasks undertaken in the workplace in a Workplace Learning Logbook. You also provide evidence of your knowledge and understanding of the workplace skills by completing a Workplace Learning Skills Journal.

The total number of hours completed in the workplace is reported on your WASSA. Completion of all requirements and at least 110 hours in the workplace is equivalent to a subject pass for graduation.

These conditions for ADWPL also apply to students studying their Pre-Apprenticeship or their School-Based Apprenticeship (SBT). You are required to complete the official logbook for apprentices. This workplace component of the SBT or SBA also counts as a subject equivalent towards graduation.

This course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Certificate II in Music Industry (CUA20615)

Summary

More information: Mr Kuipers (HOLA), Mr Thomson

Certificate Overview

The goal of our music program is to encourage and equip you to delight in God and serve others through a life-long enjoyment of and engagement in music.

The Certificate II in Music Industry is offered to students under the auspices of the College of Sound and Music Production (RTO #41549). This qualification is for those students who have an interest in music and are keen to develop skills as a musician or producer with the aim to perform, use music technology, and be involved with live music events.

Core units of competency in the program include developing and updating industry knowledge, participating in work, health, and safety processes, and working effectively with others.

The elective units in the program allow you to develop skills in an area of interest, including preparing for performances, developing audio skills and knowledge, or repairing and maintaining audio equipment.

The Certificate is offered as a preparatory program and pathway into the Certificate III in Music Industry course.

This course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Certificate II in Community Services (CHC22015)

Summary

More information: Mr Blennerhassett

Certificate Overview

The Certificate II in Community Services is an entry level vocational qualification that allows you to develop skills and knowledge to undertake work such as providing support and assistance to a variety of clients.

The community services sector may include caring for clients in childcare, aged care, disability services, and more.

The program is designed for students looking to move into a caring career and is a good building block for developing a sound educational base for employment or further study in a fast-growing sector in Australia.

Key learning areas include:

  • Introduction to the community services industry
  • Working with diverse people
  • Communication in the workplace
  • Workplace health and safety
  • Working with clients and providing first point of contact
  • Understanding industry areas (childcare, aged care, disability services focus)

Career opportunities may include:

  • Community services worker
  • assistant child-care worker
  • aged-care assistant
  • assistant disability services worker
  • customer service worker

Further study pathways may include:

  • Certificate III-IV up to Diploma in Community Services
  • VET studies in a focussed area of interest (e.g. Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care, Certificate III in Assistant in Nursing Care, etc.)
  • university studies in Health Sciences, Social Sciences, etc. (subject to university entry requirements)

This certificate is conducted over 2 years.

This course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Chemistry ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr Yu, Mr Taylor (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum of B grade in Year 10 Science overall and minimum C grade in Mathematics 10.1, Semester 1.

Senior School Science Pathways

To assist you in your Science subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Chemistry can be defined as the study and classification of matter and the changes it undergoes. Not a day goes by without us encountering chemical changes. Such activities as lighting a match, digesting food, cooking food, metals corroding, running a car – all involve chemical changes. Every day we use chemicals – detergents, plastics, glass, air, clothing.

We have some knowledge about the behaviour of chemicals together, such as the fact that oil and water don’t mix, but why don’t they?

Chemistry explores the properties of substances that constitute creation, and their interactions. Chemistry is much more than symbols, formulae, and tables. It is about understanding matter, the environment, and industrial processes.

You will take this chemical knowledge, learned by combining facts, theories, equations, and laws and by your own observations through experimentation, see how Chemical Science is used in our society for domestic and industrial applications.

Unit 2: Chemical Fundamentals – Structure, Properties, and Reactions

This unit includes the study of models of atomic structure and bonding to explain the macroscopic properties of materials and properties of nanomaterials.

The energy changes associated with chemical reactions and the use of chemical equations to calculate the masses of substances involved in chemical reactions are also covered.

Unit 2: Molecular Interactions and Reactions

This unit includes the study of bonding models and the relationship between structure, properties, and reactions, including the consideration of the factors that affect the rate of chemical reactions.

The unique properties of water and the properties of acids and bases; use of chemical equations to calculate the concentrations and volumes of solutions involved in chemical reactions; and the identification of ions in aqueous solutions with flame tests are also covered.

Senior School Chemistry is essential for tertiary-level which involve Chemistry units, such as Pharmacy, Health, or Medical Sciences, Engineering, Biological Science, Food Science, Environmental Science, or Geo-science careers. You need to study at least one of Maths Methods or Maths Applications, and Maths Specialist concurrently with Chemistry.

These ATAR Units lead on to Chemistry Units 3 and 4 in Year 12, and are suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Chemistry ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information:  Mr Yu, Mr Taylor (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A C grade in Chemistry ATAR Units 1-2 and C grade in Maths Methods or Maths Applications

Course Overview

Chemistry is the study of matter and its interactions. It is an indispensable human activity that has contributed to essential knowledge and understanding of God’s creation.

Chemical knowledge has enabled us to understand matter and devise processes for activities such as cooking and preserving food; purifying air and water; recycling plastics; creating and building computers; anaesthetising patients; and communicating with others around the world about Chemistry.

It has also allowed people to design and produce materials for purposes that include transport and fuels; cosmetic and beauty products; building products; medical treatments and pharmaceuticals; and cleaning agents.

The significant achievements of Chemistry stretch across every facet of our lives; however, some may come at a price if they are not used with the greatest of care. God has given us this world and we must take care of it. Chemical monitoring tells us that some materials that may pose a threat to ourselves and other life forms have entered the environment. Ongoing developments and improved understanding of Chemistry can also be used to solve these problems.

Unit 3: Equilibrium, Acids and Bases, and Redox Reactions

The idea of reversibility of reaction is vital in a variety of chemical systems at different scales, ranging from the processes that release carbon dioxide into our atmosphere to the reactions of ions within individual cells in our bodies. Processes that are reversible will respond to a range of factors and can achieve a state of dynamic equilibrium.

In this unit, you will investigate acid-base equilibrium systems and their applications. You will use contemporary models to explain the nature of acids and bases, and their properties and uses. This understanding enables further exploration of the varying strengths of acids and bases. You will investigate the principles of oxidation, reduction reactions, and the production of electricity from electrochemical cells.

Unit 4: Organic Chemistry and Chemical Synthesis

This unit focuses on organic chemistry and the processes of chemical synthesis by which useful substances are produced for the benefit of society.

You will investigate the relationship between the structure, properties, and chemical reactions of different organic functional groups and the vast diversity of organic compounds. You will also develop your understanding of the process of chemical synthesis to form useful substances and products and the need to consider a range of factors in the design of these processes.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

English General Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: Band 8 in NAPLAN or Level 2 in the OLNA Test, and a minimum C grade in English 10, Semester 1. If you do not qualify for the Year 11 English General Course you will study the Year 11 English Foundation Course.

Course Overview

The English General course focuses on consolidating and refining the skills and knowledge you need to become a competent, confident, and engaged user of English in everyday community, social, further education, training, and workplace contexts. It is designed to provide you with the skills that will empower you to succeed in a wide range of post-secondary pathways.

The course develops your language, literacy, and literary skills to enable you to communicate successfully both orally and in writing and to enjoy using language for both imaginative and practical purposes.

You will comprehend, analyse, interpret, and evaluate the content, structure, and style of a wide variety of texts. You will learn how the interaction of structure, language, audience, and context helps to shape meaning. Both independently and collaboratively, you will apply your knowledge to create analytical, imaginative, interpretive, and persuasive texts in different modes and media.

Unit 1 focuses on your ability to comprehend and respond to the ideas and information presented in texts.

Unit 2 focuses on interpreting ideas and arguments in a range of texts and contexts. The processes of listening, speaking, reading, viewing, and writing (language modes) will support your effective learning. Texts include fiction, non-fiction, media, everyday texts, and workplace texts.

General English requires you to be willing to learn, be self-motivated, and to extend yourself fully. The course builds on the work done in the Year 10 English. You will be expected to read and view widely, engage with multimodal texts, and respond to these in both speaking and writing tasks.

As with all English courses, you will be encouraged to develop a Christian perspective on what you view, read, discuss, and write about.

This course leads to English General Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

English General Units 3-4

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Ball, Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in English General Units 1-2. A C grade or higher in Year 12 English adequately satisfies the English Language Competence Requirement for Secondary Graduation and the WACE.

Course Overview

In Unit 3, you will explore representations of themes, issues, ideas, and concepts through comparison of texts. You will analyse and compare the relationships between language, genre, and contexts, comparing texts within and/or across different genres and modes.

You will learn to recognise and analyse the conventions of genre in texts and consider how those conventions assist interpretation. You will compare and evaluate the effect of different media, forms and modes, and how audiences respond to them. An understanding of these concepts is demonstrated through the creation of a range of responses.

In Unit 4, you will examine different interpretations and perspectives to further develop your knowledge and analysis of purpose and style. You will challenge perspectives, values, and attitudes in texts, developing and testing your own interpretations. You will explore relationships between content and structure, voice and perspectives and the text and context. Yu will extend your experience of language and texts and explore your ideas through your own reading and viewing. You will demonstrate understanding of the texts studied through the creation of a range of responses.

The course builds on the work done in Year 11 English General. You will be expected to read and view widely and to respond in both speaking and writing to what you read. As with all the English courses, you will be encouraged to develop a Christian perspective on what you read, discuss, and write about.

This course includes an Externally Set Task, which is worth 15% of the final mark.

This course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

English Foundation Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: Students who have not demonstrated the minimum standard in the OLNA literacy component are eligible to enrol.

Course Overview

The course includes language development for different situations through the study of a range of texts and assists you in using the English language in different social contexts.

Acquisition of vocabulary, pronunciation, spelling, grammar and developing written and oral presentations that flow, as well a range of related skills are incorporated in the course. These are assessed in three outcomes:

  • Reading – comprehending, analysing, etc.
  • Producing – constructing or creating written and multimodal fiction and non-fiction texts
  • Speaking and Listening – discussions, roleplays, interviews, etc.

Literacy is taught in contexts appropriate for work, for community participation, and for everyday personal contexts.
As with all the English courses, you will be encouraged to develop a Christian perspective on what you read, discuss, and write about.

Following the achievement of the minimum standard in the literacy component of the OLNA students will enter the English General course.

The English Foundation course enables you to continue learning, prepares you for entry into further study or employment, and develops a sense of community and self-worth. You will develop increasing confidence in interpreting texts in your lives and articulating your ideas about the lives, societies, and cultures they desire.

This is a course suitable for students seeking Training WA or Vocational entrance.

English Foundation Units 3-4

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Ball, Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: Students who have not demonstrated the minimum standard in the OLNA literacy component are eligible to enrol in the English Foundation Course.

Course Overview

The course includes language development for different situations through the study of a range of texts and assists you in using the English language in different social contexts.

Acquisition of vocabulary, pronunciation, spelling, grammar, developing written and oral presentations that flow, as well as a range of related skills are incorporated in the course. These are assessed in three outcomes:

  • Reading – comprehending, analysing, etc.
  • Producing – constructing or creating written and multimodal fiction and non-fiction texts
  • Speaking and Listening – discussions, roleplays, interviews, etc.

Literacy is taught in contexts appropriate for work, for community participation, and for everyday personal contexts.

As with all the English courses, you will be encouraged to develop a Christian perspective on what you read, discuss, and write about.

Following the achievement of the minimum standard in the OLNA literacy component, you will enter the English General course.

The English Foundation course enables you to continue learning, prepares you for entry into further study or employment, and develops a sense of community and self-worth. You will develop increasing confidence in interpreting texts in your lives and articulating your ideas about the lives, societies, and cultures you desire.

This course includes an Externally Set Task, which is worth 15% of the final mark.

This course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

English ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum high C grade in English 10(1) or English 10(1 Extension) in Semester 1 is required, along with a recommendation from the Year 10 English teacher. If you have achieved at this level you should be able to confidently choose Year 11 ATAR English. If you are not achieving a high level across all areas of English you are highly unlikely to cope with the demands of this subject. It is assumed that you already possess a very broad and solid grounding in vocabulary, spelling, written expression, syntax, and reading skills upon entering this course. The course is very demanding, and students with high achievement in Year 10 have a significantly better chance of success in this course.

Course Overview

You will explore how meaning is communicated through the relationships between language, text, purpose, context, and audience. You will analyse the representation of ideas, attitudes, and voices in texts to consider how texts represent the world and human experience. The organising framework for these units consists of texts in contexts, language and textual analysis, engaging and responding, creating texts and reflecting.

The processes of listening, speaking, reading, viewing, and writing (language modes) will be drawn on to support your effective learning. You will consider how you communicate and aim to develop improved modes of language. You will examine the various levels of language usage in literature, media, and everyday texts.

Texts are drawn from increasingly complex and unfamiliar settings, ranging from everyday language of personal experience to more abstract, specialised, and technical language drawn from a range of contexts. Texts provide important opportunities for learning about aspects of human experience and aesthetic appeal.

You should realise that, to do well in this course, you will need to read widely (e.g. novels, short stories, poems, newspapers, news magazines, non-fiction, reviews, etc.). A selection of literature, non-fiction texts, and ‘non-print media’ are dealt with in class, but this must be supplemented by extensive reading in your own time.

The College may organise outside excursions to suitable films and/or theatre productions as part of the course; however, the course assumes you have a reasonable exposure to television, films etc., apart from formal class activities.

To be successful with the course, you should be prepared to develop informed opinions regarding current affairs and issues and be able to discuss these intelligently in speech and writing. You are encouraged and helped to develop a discriminating Christian perspective on the many issues and means of communication in this course.

This course leads to English Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

English ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in English ATAR Units 1-2.

Course Overview

English ATAR Units 3-4 continue to strengthen the reading, writing, and critiquing skills you have developed in Year 11.

Unit 3 develops your knowledge and understanding of the relationship between language, culture, and identity in literary texts. You will inquire into the power of language to represent ideas, events, and people, comparing these across a range of texts, contexts, modes and forms. Through critical analysis and evaluation, the values and attitudes represented in and through texts and their impact on the reader are examined.

Throughout the unit, you will create analytical responses that are characterised by a confident, engaging style and informed observation. In creating imaginative texts, you will be able to experiment with language, adapt forms, and challenge conventions and ideas.

In Unit 4, you will examine different interpretations and perspectives to develop further your knowledge and analysis of purpose and style. You will challenge perspectives, values, and attitudes in texts, developing and testing your own interpretations through debate and argument.

Through close study of texts, you will explore the relationships between content and structure, voice and perspectives, and the text and context. This provides the opportunity for you to extend your experience of language and of texts and explore your ideas through your own reading and viewing.

You will demonstrate your understanding of the texts studied through creating imaginative, interpretive, persuasive, and analytical responses. The course will challenge you to think more deeply and analytically from a Christian perspective with regards to texts and social issues and will prepare you for a range of university courses.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Food Science and Technology General Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Mrs Howard, Mr Kuipers (HOLA)
Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites, but students should enjoy cooking and be able to work in a team.

Course Overview

Food is essential for overall health and wellbeing. This is a practical course that provides opportunities for you to develop your food-related interests and understandings through the design and production of food products within the hospitality context.

As Christians, we are called to practice hospitality, particularly to those in need. This course enables you to enhance your skills in hospitality through a strong emphasis on the development of food-related skills.

The course also further develops your understanding of the nutritional needs of adolescents and factors influencing food choices.

In Units 1 and 2 the focus is on Food Choices and Health, and Food for Communities. Key topics covered throughout this course include:

  • Sensory and physical properties of food that affect the consumption of raw and processed foods
  • Investigation of balanced diets, the function of nutrients in the body, and the application of nutrition concepts that promote healthy eating
  • Health and environmental issues that arise from lifestyle choices and factors, and which influence the purchase of locally produced commodities
  • Development of food products through the interpretation and adaptation of recipes to prepare healthy meals and snacks that meet individual needs
  • Mise-en-place, precision cutting skills, and processing techniques to ensure that safe food handling practices prevent food contamination
  • Factors that influence adolescent food choices and ethical consideration; food sources and the role of micronutrients and water for health; and nutrition-related health conditions, such as coeliac and lactose intolerance, which often require specialised diets
  • Food and beverage labelling and packaging requirements

This course leads to Food Science and Technology General Units 3-4 in Year 12.

Food Science and Technology General Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Mrs Howard, Mr Kuipers (HOLA)
Prerequisites: Preference will be given to students who have successfully completed Food Science and Technology Units 1-2. Students should enjoy cooking and be able to work within a team.

Course Overview

This is a practical course that provides you with the opportunity to explore and develop food-related interests, and to develop and apply enterprising and innovative ideas to food production. Through the development of a practical focus, you are given the opportunity to develop a more thorough understanding of the skills needed for both personal and hospitality food needs.

Food service also offers you the opportunity to develop the concept of service to one another. We show God’s love and mercy when we care for people by sharing meal times with others. You will be involved in food service opportunities as part of College activities.

This course includes an Externally Set Task, which is worth 15% of the final mark.

In Units 3-4 the focus is on Food Science and the Undercover Story. Key topics include:

  • Wet and dry methods of food processing
  • Factors that influence food choices
  • Nutritional impact of micronutrients on health
  • Cultural and lifestyle factors that impact nutritional wellbeing
  • Food commodities, including the functional properties of foods
  • The food supply chain, designing food products, and processing systems
  • Value-adding in food production
  • Selection and evaluation of resources to meet performance criteria
  • Occupational Health and Safety requirements to produce safe, quality food
  • Food spoilage and principles of food preservation including freezing, dehydrating, canning, and bottling;
  • Principles of menu planning, adapting recipes, and processing to meet dietary needs
  • Technology process to address a product proposal

Possible career and further study opportunities:

  • Training WA: Certificate to Diploma qualifications in Food Processing; Meat Processing; Seafood Industry; and Hospitality.
  • Curtin University: Education – Secondary (Home Economics); Food Science and Technology; and Nutrition.
  • Edith Cowan University: Hospitality Management; Secondary Teaching (Home Economics).

Geography ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mr Pretorius, Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade with a minimum mark of 60% in Geography (Humanities) Year 10, Semester 1. This is felt to provide a strong foundation for success in this rigorous course.  However, there may be exceptions for those achieving a lower C grade average – these students will require an interview with the HOLA.

Only students who have developed strong mapping and research skills should apply for this subject.

Course Overview

All living creatures are affected by man’s actions. Our decisions highlight the need to understand God’s laws and the need to live in harmony with God’s creation. The use of resources, the future of state forests, development of our North West, population pressures, and congestion in cities are all related to man’s stewardship of God’s creation.

Unit 1: Natural and Ecological Hazards

In this Unit, you will explore the management of hazards and the risk they pose to people and environments. You will study their impact and the ways to mitigate their damage.

Unit 2: Global Networks and Interconnections

In this Unit, you will explore the economic and cultural transformations taking place in the world. The Geography course has two interrelated strands: Geographical Knowledge and Understanding and Geographical Inquiry and Skills.

This course leads on Geography ATAR Units 3-4 and is suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Geography ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: A
More information: Mr Pretorius, Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Geography ATAR Units 1-2. Students not having taken this course must be strong, motivated students who will need to study the mapping section completed in Year 11.

Course Overview

Geography is the study of the created earth and the patterns and processes that take place according to God’s decree whereby He upholds and governs His creation. At Rehoboth, we investigate these patterns and processes from a Biblical perspective and encourage critical thought and discussion relating to differing underlying worldviews.  

As you investigate and seek to explain patterns and processes of natural and human phenomena across the earth’s surface, you will achieve a heightened awareness of the intricate detail and order in creation, and man’s role as its steward.

Unit 3: Global Environmental Change

This Unit begins with an overview of land cover change drawn from different regions and countries. Two in-depth studies provide greater detail. The first study focuses on the interrelationship between land cover and global climate change. The second study focuses on the evaluation of a local land cover change initiative designed to address climate change.

In undertaking these in-depth studies, you will develop an understanding of the use and application of geographical inquiry, tools such as spatial technologies, fieldwork and other skills to investigate human-environment systems.

Unit 4: Planning Sustainable Cities

The Unit begins with a global scale overview of the process of urbanisation and its consequences. Urbanisation not only affects human wellbeing and the rate of world population growth but creates a range of challenges for urban, rural, and remote places, including Indigenous communities.

The interconnected challenges faced in places and other matters related to liveability are a focus of this unit.

Two in-depth studies provide greater detail. The first study focuses on challenges in metropolitan Perth. The second study focuses on challenges faced in a megacity. You will examine the concepts, processes, and roles of planning in these selected contexts. This approach enables you to develop an understanding of the challenges in two urban places.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Human Biology ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr Taylor (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum B grade in the Biology component and minimum C grade in the Chemistry component of the Year 10 Science course. Students who do not meet these cut-offs may be admitted on a case by case basis, according to the teacher’s judgement.

Senior School Science Pathways

To assist you in your Science subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview
 
Why Study Human Biology?

Human Biology is an interesting general education course which would be informative and useful to any students interested in Biological, Medical or Health Science careers. We study Human Biology to:

  • gain an appreciation of God’s invisible qualities: ‘For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities – His eternal power and divine nature – have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without any excuse’ (Rom 1:20)
  • glorify God by studying His creation: ‘For by Him all things were created […] all things were created by Him and for Him’ (Col 1:16)
  • gain a foundational knowledge of the human body that will benefit students who will undertake further studies in the health or medical science fields
Unit 1: The Functioning Human Body

In this unit, you will analyse the structure and function of body systems and the interrelationships between the systems that support metabolism and body functioning.

You will also explore the lifestyle choices that affect the functioning of the human body and the importance of health education.

Unit 2: Reproduction and Inheritance

In this unit, you will study the reproductive systems of males and females, the mechanisms of transmission of genetic material from generation to generation, and the effects of the environment on gene expression.

Moral and ethical dilemmas arising from biotechnologies will also be discussed during this component of the course. You will be encouraged to make positive lifestyle choices that ‘honour God with your body’.

Scientific method and research skills are also explored to develop your skills, enabling you to undertake independent study relating to Human Biology.

These units lead to Human Biology Units 3-4 in Year 12 and are units suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Human Biology ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr Taylor (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade for Human Biological Science ATAR Units 1-2. Students not having taken Human Biological Science ATAR Units 1-2 must be strong and motivated to be considered for this course.

Course Overview
 
Why Study Human Biology?

Mankind was created in God’s image. Studying Human Biology gives us an understanding of the way that God made us, and the functioning and proper care of our bodies.

Our basis for studying Human Biology at Rehoboth is found in Genesis 1:26-27: ‘Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” So God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them.’

As we learn more about the human body we are led to marvel at the Creator.

Unit 3: Homeostasis and Disease

This unit explores the nervous and endocrine systems and the mechanisms that help maintain the systems of the body to function within a normal range, as well as and the body’s immune responses to invading pathogens.

Unit 4: Human Variation and Evolution

This unit explores the variations in humans, their changing environment, and evolutionary trends in hominids. As we explore this topic, we will also look to cross-examine the evidence for evolution in order to equip you with the knowledge and understanding to discern what is true.

Human Biology provides background knowledge for students wanting to develop a career path in any of the allied health professions (e.g. doctor, speech therapist, occupational therapist, physiotherapist, nurse, social worker, or health promotion), medical research, or sports sciences.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Indonesian: Second Language General Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: There is no prior knowledge or experience of the Indonesian language needed for this course, but it would be advantageous to have some.

Course Overview

Language learning provides the opportunity for you to engage with the linguistic and cultural diversity of God’s world and His peoples. To speak someone else’s language is to reach into their heart and their world. It is a way of being Christ to them. When we study other languages, we gain insight into the world that God has commanded us to care for.

The Indonesian: Second Language General course can connect to the world of work, further study and travel. It also offers opportunities for you to participate in the sister school and student exchange programs between Western Australia and Indonesia.

This course is designed to equip you with the skills needed to function in an increasingly globalised society, a culturally and linguistically diverse local community, and to provide the foundation for life‐long language learning.

Unit 1: Dunia Remaja (The World of Youth)

You will develop communication skills in Indonesian and gain an insight into the language and culture through the study of three topics. These include:

  • My World, Your World: You will reflect on and share aspects of your daily life, identity, school, interests, and social activities.
  • Lifestyles of Indonesian Teenagers: You will explore the lifestyles of Indonesian teenagers – including school life, sport, hobbies, leisure, and friends – and compare them with your own life.
  • Trends and Technology: You will consider shifting trends in teenage culture and the ever-changing face of communication by social media.
Unit 2: Berjalan-Jalan Di Indonesia (Out and about in Indonesia)

Through these three topics, you will develop communication skills in Indonesian and gain an insight into the language and culture. Topics include:

  • Living in My Community: You will reflect on your local neighbourhood, favourite weekend or holiday spots, and the part-time work environment from the personal perspective of a teenager living in Australia.
  • Visiting Indonesia: You will explore travelling in Indonesia, with a particular focus on going beyond Bali and developing a familiarisation with the diversity of Indonesia, engaging with local people, and understanding cultures.
  • Tourism and Travel: You will consider the benefits of travel and explore different types of tourism.

This course leads to Indonesian: Second Language General Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Indonesian: Second Language ATAR Units 1-2/First Lanague ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: You will need to have studied Indonesian in Years 8-10 and be recommended by the teacher to continue with Indonesian Units 1-2. For students wanting to take Indonesian for tertiary entrance, a minimum B grade in Year 10 is required.

Indonesian: Second Language ATAR
 
Unit 1: Saat Aku Disini (Here and Now)

You will study three topics, including:

  • Being a Teen, What Does it Mean?: You will reflect on what you do in your daily life and express your identity and what it means to be a teenager. You will discuss moving into adulthood, coping with pressures, socialising, and developing relationships.
  • Indonesian Communities: You will explore the influence of culture on lifestyle in Indonesia through a study of music, film, and national and religious celebrations.
  • Staying Connected: You will consider communication in a changing world and its influence on culture and language.
Unit 2: Bisa Saya Bantu? (Can I Help You?)

You will study three topics, including:

  • My Country: You will reflect on the appeal of Australia to travellers and the reasons why Indonesians travel to Australia. You will discuss the importance of cross-cultural engagement when interacting with Indonesian visitors to develop deeper relationships.
  • Careers and Travel: You will consider future education and employment opportunities as well as travel and community service pathways in a fast-developing world.
  • On Exchange: You will explore preparations for student exchange to Indonesia and discover how exchange visits link communities, broaden friendships, and bring new opportunities as well as challenges.
Indonesian: First Language

The Indonesian: First Language ATAR course is adapted from the BOSTES NSW course for Heritage Indonesian. This course focuses on building on and further developing your language capability through engagement with Indonesian-speaking communities, locally and overseas, and through the study of contemporary texts, topics and issues.

The course is aimed at students who have typically been brought up in a home where Indonesian is used, and they have a connection to that culture. The College prepares you for the exam with the Indonesian: Second Language ATAR students.

LOTE Bonus

If you have a scaled score in LOTE, 10% of your LOTE scaled score is added to your Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (best four scaled scores). You receive the LOTE bonus even if your LOTE course wasn’t counted in one of your best four.

These units lead to Indonesian: Second Language Units 3-4 in Year 12 and are suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Indonesian: Second Language ATAR Units 1-2/First Lanague ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: You will need to have completed Indonesian: Second Language ATAR Units 1-2.

Indonesian: Second Language ATAR
 
Unit 3: Aneka Wacana (Exploring Texts)

You will study three topics, including:

  • Texts and Genres
  • Media and Entertainment
  • Globalisation and the Media

You will extend and refine your communication skills in Indonesian and gain a broader and deeper understanding of the language and culture.

Unit 4: Isu Hangat (Exploring Issues)

You will study three topics, including:

  • Youth Issues
  • Social Issues
  • Australia/Indonesia Relations

You will extend and refine your communication skills in Indonesian and gain a broader and deeper understanding of the language and culture.

Indonesian: First Language

The Indonesian: First Language ATAR course is adapted from the BOSTES NSW course for Heritage Indonesian. This course focuses on building on and further developing your language capability through engagement with Indonesian-speaking communities, locally and overseas, and through the study of contemporary texts, topics and issues.

The course is aimed at students who have typically been brought up in a home where Indonesian is used and they have a connection to that culture. The College prepares you for the exam with the Indonesian: Second Language ATAR students.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Integrated Science General Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr Eikelboom, Mr Taylor (HOLA)
Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course; however, preference will be given to students who have achieved a minimum C grade in at least one of the four units covered in Year 10 (Earth Science, Physics, Biology, or Chemistry).

Senior School Science Pathways

To assist you in your Science subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

This course is designed for students who are interested in getting hands-on with science and exploring God’s world through practical research and investigation.

The Integrated Science General course is grounded in the belief that science is, in essence, a practical activity. The course enables students you to investigate science issues in the context of the world around you, and encourages collaboration and cooperation with community members employed in scientific pursuits.

The course requires you to be creative, intellectually honest, be able to evaluate arguments with scepticism, and to conduct your investigations in ways that are ethical, fair, and respectful of others.

The course includes aspects of biology, chemistry, geology and physics. The learning contexts may change from year to year as teachers are free to choose the content and learning experiences that best suit the needs of their students. For example, the learning contexts in Year 11 may include:

  • Unit 1: Marine Biology, Ecology, Biotechnology, or Sustainability
  • Unit 2: Forensics, Rocketry, Cosmetics, or Kitchen Chemistry

Integrated Science will provide a valuable foundation in scientific thinking and understanding for a variety of career pathways.

This course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Integrated Science General Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr Eikelboom, Mr Taylor (HOLA)
Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course; however, it is preferred that students have completed Units 1-2 in Year 11.

Course Overview

This course utilises much of the science content covered in previous years. It is designed for students who are interested in getting hands-on with science and exploring the God’s world through practical research and investigation.

The Integrated Science General course is grounded in the belief that science is, in essence, a practical activity. From this stems the view that conceptual understandings in science derive from a need to find solutions to real problems in the first instance. The inquiring scientist may then take these understandings and apply them in a new context, often quite removed from their original field. This course seeks to reflect this creative element of science as inquiry, reflecting this aspect of the Creator.

The course will include aspects of biology, chemistry, geology and physics. You will be involved in research that develops a variety of skills, including the use of appropriate technology, an array of diverse methods of investigation, and a sense of the practical application of the domain. It emphasises formulating and testing hypotheses and the critical importance of evidence in forming conclusions. This course enables you to investigate science issues in the context of the world around you, and encourages collaboration and cooperation with community members employed in scientific pursuits. It requires you to be creative, intellectually honest, to evaluate arguments with scepticism, and to conduct their investigations in ways that are ethical, fair and respectful of others.

The Integrated Science General course is inclusive and aims to be attractive to students with a wide variety of backgrounds, interests, and career aspirations.

The learning contexts may change from year to year as teachers are free to choose the content and learning experiences that best suit the needs of their students. For example, the learning contexts in Year 12 may include:

  • Unit 3: Aquaculture, Marine Ecology, or Horticulture
  • Unit 4: Rocketry, Kitchen Chemistry, or Vehicles and Drivers

As part of this course in Year 12, you will be required to sit an Externally Set Task relating to the content covered in Unit 3.

This course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Literature ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mr Dougherty, Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum of A grade in English 10.1 , or B grade in English 10.1 (Extension) in Semester 1 is required. Students who have achieved at this level should be able to cope with the Literature ATAR course. A recommendation from the Year 10 English teacher is also required.

Course Overview

Unit 1 develops your knowledge and understanding of different ways of reading and creating literary texts drawn from a wide range of historical, social, cultural, and personal contexts. You will analyse the relationships between language, text, contexts, individual points of view, and the reader’s response. Prose fiction, poetry, and drama are also studied.

The significance of ideas and the distinctive qualities of texts are analysed through detailed textual study. By creating analytical responses, you will frame consistent arguments that are substantiated by relevant evidence. By creating imaginative texts, you will explore and experiment with aspects of style and form.

Unit 2 develops your knowledge and understanding of intertextuality (the ways literary texts connect with each other). You will consider the relationships between texts, genres, authors, readers, audiences, and contexts. The ideas, language, and structure of different texts are compared and contrasted.

Exploring connections between texts involves analysing their similarities and differences through an analysis of the ideas, language used and forms of texts. You will create evidence‐based and convincing analytical responses. By experimenting with text structures and language features, you will understand how your imaginative texts are informed by analytical responses.

Christians know that language and creativity are special aspects of having been created in God’s image. We have many great opportunities in a Christian school to look at the ideas communicated in texts and to think about how we should respond as Christians.

Literature can be a powerful way of reflecting humans’ inherent struggles with and against God. This leads us to consider such questions as:

  • What is a Christian response to culture?
  • How can we use language to the glory of God?
  • What makes a book a Christian text?
  • How can understanding Literature help us understand the world God calls us to serve?

This course leads to Literature Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Literature ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Christie, Mrs Erispe (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Literature ATAR Units 1-2 is required.

Course Overview

Literature ATAR Units 3-4 build on the literary theory, discussion, and writing skills developed in Year 11.

Unit 3 develops your knowledge and understanding of the relationship between language, culture, and identity in literary texts. You will inquire into the power of language to represent ideas, events, and people, comparing these across a range of texts, contexts, modes, and forms. Through critical analysis and evaluation, the values and attitudes represented in and through texts and their impact on the reader are examined.

Throughout the unit, you will create analytical responses that are characterised by a confident, engaging style and informed observation. In creating imaginative texts, you will experiment with language, adapt forms and challenge conventions and ideas.

Unit 4 develops your appreciation of the significance of literary study through close critical analysis of literary texts drawn from a range of forms, genres, and styles. You will reflect upon the creative use of language and the structural and stylistic features that shape meaning and influence response.

The unit focuses on the dynamic nature of literary interpretation and considers the insights texts offer, their use of literary conventions, and aesthetic appeal. Analytical responses demonstrate increasing independence in interpreting texts and synthesising a range of perspectives into critical and imaginative responses.

In creating imaginative texts, you will experiment with literary conventions and reflect on how the created text takes into account the expectations of audiences.

The course also presents many opportunities for Christians to think beyond the surface aspects of texts. The texts studied help us to consider a range of worldviews and how these measure up against Biblical thinking. Literature studies in a Christian school help to develop your ability to discriminate and to think Christianly.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Materials Design and Technology General Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr Kuipers
Prerequisites: None

Course Overview

If we believe that we are God’s creation, designed and made in His image, then we reflect something of God’s nature when we design and create. Through this course, you will have opportunities to glorify God in this unique way.

The Materials Design and Technology General course is a practical course. You will work in the timber context, with the design and manufacture of products as the major focus.

You will have the opportunity to develop and practise skills that contribute to creating a physical product while acquiring an appreciation of the application of a design process, and an understanding of the need for materials sustainability. You will learn and practise manufacturing processes and technologies, including principles of design, planning, and management.

Mathematics Essential General Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: Completion of Maths 10.1 or 10.2. Students who do not qualify for the Year 11 Maths Essential General need to select the Year 11 Maths Foundation Course.

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God, and develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

Unit 1 provides you with the mathematical skills and understanding to solve problems relating to calculations, applications of measurement, the use of formulas to find an unknown quantity, and the interpretation of graphs.

Throughout this unit, you will use the mathematical thinking process. The content of the four topics covered are:

  • Basic Calculations, Percentages and Rates
  • Algebra
  • Measurement
  • Graphs

Possible contexts for this unit are Earning and Managing Money and Nutrition and Health. An extensive range of technological applications and techniques will be used in teaching this unit. An important skill is the ability to work flexibly with technology.

The number formats for the unit are whole numbers, decimals, common fractions, common percentages, square, and cubic numbers written with powers.

Unit 2 provides you with the mathematical skills and understanding to solve problems related to representing and comparing data, percentages, rates and ratios and time and motion. You will further develop the use of the mathematical thinking process and apply the statistical investigation process. The statistical investigation process is explicitly taught in conjunction with the statistical content within this unit.

The content of the four topics covered are:

  • Representing and Comparing Data
  • Percentages
  • Rates and Ratios
  • Time and Motion

Possible contexts for this unit are Transport and Independent Living. You will be taught this course with an extensive range of technological applications and techniques.

The number formats for the unit are whole numbers, decimals, fractions and percentages, rates and ratios.

This course leads to Mathematics Essential General Units 3-4 and is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Mathematics Essential General Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Mathematics Essential General Units 1-2 is required.

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

Unit 3 provides you with the mathematical skills and understanding to solve problems related to measurement, scales, plans and models, drawing and interpreting graphs, and data collection. You will use the mathematical thinking process and apply the statistical investigation process.

The content of the four topics in this unit are:

  • Measurement
  • Scales, Plans, and Models
  • Graphs in Practical Situations
  • Data Collection

A variety of approaches are used to provide a context that is meaningful and interesting. Possible contexts for this unit are Construction and Design, and Medicine.

Unit 4 provides you with the mathematical skills and understanding to solve problems related to Probability, Earth Geometry and Time Zones, and Loans and Compound Interest.

You will use the mathematical thinking process and apply the statistical investigation process to solve problems involving probability.

The content of the three topics in this unit are:

  • Probability and Relative Frequencies
  • Earth Geometry and Time Zones
  • Loans and Compound Interest

Possible contexts for this unit are Finance and Travel.

This course includes an Externally Set Task, which is worth 15% of the final mark.

This General course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Mathematics Foundation General Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: If you have not demonstrated the minimum standard in the OLNA numeracy component you will need to enrol in the Mathematics Foundation Course.

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

The Mathematics Foundations course focuses on building your capacity, confidence, and disposition to use mathematics to meet the numeracy standard for the WACE. It provides you with the knowledge, skills, and understanding to solve problems across a range of contexts including personal, community and workplace/employment. This course prepares you for the post-school options of employment and further training.

Unit 1 provides you with the mathematical knowledge, understanding, and skills to solve problems relating to addition and subtraction, length, mass, capacity and time. It involves the extraction of information from, and the interpretation of, various simple forms of data representation used in everyday contexts. The number formats in Unit 1 are whole numbers and money.

Unit 2 provides you with the mathematical knowledge, understanding, and skills relating to fractions and decimals to solve problems relating to multiplication and division, perimeter, area and volume and qualitative probability from everyday contexts. The number formats in Unit 2 are whole numbers, money, fractions and decimals.

Progression to Mathematics Essential Course
Following the achievement of the minimum standard in the OLNA numeracy component you will transfer to the Maths Essential General course.

Mathematics Foundation General Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: If you have not demonstrated the minimum standard in the OLNA numeracy component you will need to enrol in the Mathematics Foundation course.

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

The Mathematics Foundations course focuses on building your capacity, confidence, and disposition to use mathematics to meet the numeracy standard for the WACE. It provides you with the knowledge, skills, and understanding to solve problems across a range of contexts including personal, community and workplace/employment. This course prepares you for the post-school options of employment and further training.

Unit 3 provides you with the mathematical knowledge, understanding, and skills relating to percentages and the link to fractions and decimals and the solving of problems relating to the four operations using whole number, fractions and decimals. Location, time and temperature, and shape and its relationship to design, are also covered in this unit.

Unit 4 provides you with the mathematical knowledge, understanding, and skills relating to rates and ratios, and the connection between statistics and probability. The collection of mathematical concepts and thinking processes covered in this and previous units culminates in the solving of comprehensive real-life problems encountered in personal, workplace, and community contexts.

This course includes an Externally Set Task, which is worth 15% of the final mark.

Progression to Mathematics Essential Course

Following the achievement of the minimum standard in the OLNA numeracy component you will transfer to the Maths Essential General course.

Mathematics Applications ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Maths 10.1 or a minimum of 75% in Maths 10.2.

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

Unit 1 includes three topics:

  • Consumer arithmetic reviews the concepts of rate and percentage change in the context of earning and managing money and provides a fertile ground for the use of spreadsheets.
  • Algebra and matrices continue on from the Year 7-10 curriculum study of algebra and introduces the topic of matrices. The emphasis of this topic is the symbolic representation and manipulation of information from real-life contexts using algebra and matrices.
  • Shape and measurement build on and extends the knowledge and skills students developed in the Year 7–10 curriculum with the concept of similarity and associated calculations involving simple geometric shapes. The emphasis in this topic is on applying these skills in a range of practical contexts, including those involving three-dimensional shapes. 

Unit 2 includes three topics:

  • Univariate data analysis and the statistical process develops your ability to organise and summarise univariate data in the context of conducting a statistical investigation.
  • Linear equations and their graphs use linear equations and straight-line graphs, as well as linear-piece-wise and step graphs to model and analyse practical situations.
  • Applications of trigonometry extends your knowledge of trigonometry to solve practical problems involving non-right-angled triangles in both two and three dimensions. This includes problems involving the use of angles of elevation and depression and bearings in navigation. 

This course leads to Mathematics Applications ATAR Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Mathematics Applications ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Mathematics Applications ATAR Units 1-2.

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

Unit 3 includes three topics:

  • Bivariate data analysis introduces you to some methods for identifying, analysing, and describing associations between pairs of variables, including the use of the least-squares method as a tool for modelling and analysing linear associations. The content is taught within the framework of the statistical investigation process.
  • Growth and decay in sequences employs recursion to generate sequences that can be used to model and investigate patterns of growth and decay in discrete situations. These sequences find application in a wide range of practical situations, including modelling the growth of a compound interest investment, the growth of a bacterial population, or the decrease in the value of a car over time.
  • Graphs and networks introduce you to the language of graphs and the ways in which they can be represented as a collection of points and interconnecting lines, and be used to model and analyse everyday situations, such as a rail or social networks. 

Unit 4 includes three topics:

  • Time series analysis continues your study of statistics by introducing you to the concepts and techniques of time series analysis. The content is taught within the framework of the statistical investigation process.
  • Loans investments and annuities aim to provide you with sufficient knowledge of financial mathematics to solve practical problems associated with taking out or refinancing a mortgage and making investments.
  • Networks and decision mathematics use networks to model and aid decision making in practical situations.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Mathematics Methods ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum B grade in Maths 10 (Extension) with a minimum 70% mark.

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

Unit 1 begins with a review of the basic algebraic concepts and techniques required for a successful introduction to the study of Calculus. The basic trigonometric functions are then introduced. Simple relationships between variable quantities are reviewed, and these are used to introduce the key concepts of a function and its graph.

The study of inferential statistics begins in this unit with a review of the fundamentals of probability and the introduction of the concepts of counting, conditional probability and independence.

Your access to technology will support the computational and graphical aspects of these topics.

The algebra section of Unit 2 focuses on exponentials. Exponential graphs are examined and their applications in a wide range of settings are explored. Arithmetic and geometric sequences are introduced, and their applications are studied.

Rates and average rates of change are introduced. This is followed by the key concept of the derivative as an instantaneous rate of change. These concepts are reinforced numerically, by calculating difference quotients both geometrically as slopes of chords and tangents, and algebraically.

Calculus is developed to study the derivatives of polynomial functions, with simple application of the derivative to curve sketching, the calculation of slopes and equations of tangents, the determination of instantaneous velocities and the solution of optimisation problems. The unit concludes with a consideration of anti-differentiation.

Maths Bonus

If you have a scaled score in Mathematics Methods ATAR and/or Mathematics Specialist ATAR, 10% of your scaled score(s) in these subjects will be added to your Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (your best four scaled scores). You will receive this Mathematics bonus even if the course(s) aren’t in your best four.

This course leads to Mathematics Methods ATAR Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Mathematics Methods ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Mathematics Methods ATAR Units 1-2.

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

 

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

In Unit 3 the study of Calculus continues with the derivatives of exponential and trigonometric functions and their applications, together with some differentiation techniques and applications to optimisation problems and graph sketching. The topic concludes with integration, both as a process that reverses differentiation and as a way of calculating areas. The fundamental theorem of calculus as a link between differentiation and integration is emphasised.

In statistics, discrete random variables are introduced, together with their uses in modelling random processes involving chance and variation. This supports the development of a framework for statistical inference.

In Unit 4 Calculus deals with derivatives of logarithmic functions. In probability and statistics, continuous random variables and their applications are introduced, and the normal distribution is used in a variety of contexts. The study of statistical inference in this unit is the culmination of earlier work on probability and random variables.

Statistical inference is one of the most important parts of statistics, in which the goal is to estimate an unknown parameter associated with a population using a sample of data drawn from that population. In the Mathematics Methods ATAR course, statistical inference is restricted to estimating proportions in two-outcome populations.

Maths Bonus

If you have a scaled score in Mathematics Methods ATAR and/or Mathematics Specialist ATAR, 10% of your scaled score(s) in these subjects will be added to your Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (your best four scaled scores). You will receive this Mathematics bonus even if the course(s) aren’t in your best four.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Mathematics Specialist ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
Subject fees: None
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: An A grade in Maths 10 (Extension). For university entrance, you will need to select this course as well as Mathematics Methods Unit 1-2. 

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

Unit 1 includes three topics:

  • The proficiency strand (reasoning in the Year 7-10 curriculum) is continued explicitly in Geometry through a discussion of developing mathematical arguments. While these ideas are illustrated through deductive Euclidean geometry in this topic, they recur throughout all topics in the course. Geometry also provides the opportunity to summarise and extend students’ studies in Euclidean Geometry. An understanding of this topic is of great benefit in the study of later topics in the course, including vectors and complex numbers.
  • Vectors in the Plane provides new perspectives for working with two-dimensional space and serves as an introduction to techniques that will be extended to three-dimensional space in Unit 3.
  • Combinatorics provides techniques that are useful in many areas of mathematics, including probability and algebra. All topics develop your ability to construct mathematical arguments.

The three topics considerably broaden your mathematical experience and therefore begin an awakening to the breadth and utility of the course.

Unit 2 includes three topics:

  • Trigonometry contains techniques that are used in other topics in both this Unit and Unit 3.
  • Real and Complex Numbers provides a continuation of your study of numbers, and the study of complex numbers is continued in Unit 3. This topic also contains a section on proof by mathematical induction.
  • Matrices, including applications to linear transformations of the plane, are also studied.

Maths Bonus
If you have a scaled score in Mathematics Methods ATAR and/or Mathematics Specialist ATAR, 10% of your scaled score(s) in these subjects will be added to your Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (your best four scaled scores). You will receive this Mathematics bonus even if the course(s) aren’t in your best four.

This course leads to Mathematics Specialist ATAR Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Mathematics Specialist ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Miss Smoker (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Mathematics Specialist ATAR Units 1-2. For university entrance, you will need to select this course as well as Mathematics Methods Unit 3-4. 

Senior School Mathematics Pathways

To assist you in your Mathematics subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Our basis for studying Mathematics at Rehoboth is found in Colossians 1:15-17: ‘He [Christ] is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation; for in Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through Him and for Him. He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together.’

We use our knowledge and skills in Mathematics to enable us to understand the physical world God has created and the purposes for which we were created. Our intention is that you will understand that the consistency of mathematical truths demonstrates the order and precision of God and will develop an understanding that mathematical truths are always the same and that they exist because God made them.

Unit 3 contains three topics:

  • Complex Numbers
  • Functions and Sketching Graphs
  • Vectors in Three Dimensions

The study of vectors was introduced in Unit 1 with a focus on vectors in two-dimensional space. In this unit, three-dimensional vectors are studied, and vector equations and vector calculus are introduced, with the latter extending your knowledge of Calculus from the Mathematics Methods ATAR course.

Cartesian and vector equations, together with equations of planes, enables you to solve geometric problems and problems involving motion in three-dimensional space. The Cartesian form of complex numbers was introduced in Unit 2, and the study of complex numbers is now extended to the polar form. The study of functions and techniques of graph sketching, begun in the Mathematics Methods ATAR course, is extended and applied in sketching graphs and solving problems involving integration.

Unit 4 contains three topics:

  • Integration and Applications of Integration
  • Rates of Change and Differential Equations
  • Statistical Inference

In Unit 4, the study of differentiation and integration of functions continues, and the Calculus techniques developed in this and previous topics are applied to simple differential equations, in particular in biology and kinematics. These topics demonstrate the real-world applications of the mathematics learned throughout the Mathematics Specialist ATAR course.

In this unit, your previous experience working with probability and statistics is drawn together in the study of statistical inference for the distribution of sample means and confidence intervals for sample means.

Maths Bonus
If you have a scaled score in Mathematics Methods ATAR and/or Mathematics Specialist ATAR, 10% of your scaled score(s) in these subjects will be added to your Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (your best four scaled scores). You will receive this bonus even if the course(s) aren’t in your best four.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Modern History ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Woodford
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade with a minimum mark of 65% in Year 10 Humanities and a minimum B grade in English Year 10 with a minimum mark of 65% in Semester 1. Students with these grades have a much greater likelihood of success in this course.

Course Overview

History is a significant part of Christian education as it examines the actions of man in the world which God has created. It is throughout history that God has worked. The study of history is an important component in the education of a well-rounded, informed member of society. In order to understand why our present world and society is organised as it is, and faces the problems it does, we need to study and interpret the past.

You will take part in a variety of reading, writing, listening, thinking, viewing, and discussing activities. One of the main practical benefits of studying history is to develop skills which will be of great value in future studies. It is an enjoyable and stimulating subject for the student who is motivated to pursue an interest in depth.

The course studies the changes in the lives of ordinary people, as well as the major political and economic struggles in the USA and Germany during the 20th century. You will learn about a variety of political, economic, military, cultural, and social aspects which have influenced our times.

Unit 1: Capitalism – The American Experience 1907-1941

This unit examines the broad focus of capitalism in the United States in the generation prior to World War II. Topics include:

  • the rise of capitalism and consumerism
  • the growth of the railways and the oil industry
  • Henry Ford, the automobile industry and mass production
  • the ‘Roaring Twenties’ and the ‘Jazz age’
  • movies and fashion
  • the Wall Street Crash and the Great Depression
  • FDR and the New Deal
  • capitalism vs communism
Unit 2: Nazism in Germany 1918-1945

This unit examines significant movements for change in the 20th century. It covers Germany in the period from the end of World War I to the end of World War II. Topics include:

  • the collapse of Imperial Germany
  • the Versailles Treaty
  • Weimar Germany and 1920s culture
  • the rise of the Nazi Party
  • Adolf Hitler and his henchmen
  • the Munich Putsch
  • the Reichstag Fire
  • the Night of the Long Knives
  • the Hitler Youth
  • the ‘Final Solution’
  • Nazi propaganda
  • the fall of Nazi Germany

This course leads to Modern History ATAR Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Modern History ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Woodford
Prerequisites: A minimum C in Modern History ATAR Units 1-2. If you have not completed Units 1-2 you must demonstrate a strong academic background and be well-motivated, with a minimum B grade in English ATAR Units 1-2.

Course Overview

History is a significant part of Christian education as we can see how God is working His plan for creation. Like detectives, historians have to search for clues and evidence to reconstruct the past, and then go on to interpret and analyse the events. They not only attempt to piece together the ‘story’ of what happened but also try to understand why and how the events unfolded.

One of the main benefits of studying history is to develop research, essay writing, document interpretation, and analytical skills which will be of great value in university studies. It is an interesting subject for the student who wishes to gain an understanding of how the present is built on our past, why our present world and society is organised as it is, and why it faces the problems it does.

Unit 3: Russia and the Soviet Union 1914-1945

This unit will examine Russia in the period from World War I to World War II. Topics will include:

  • Marxism, Leninism, and Stalinism
  • the impact of World War I
  • the 1917 Revolutions
  • the Russian Civil War
  • the struggle between Stalin and Trotsky
  • Stalin’s process of industrialisation
  • the social and cultural impact of Bolshevism
  • Soviet repression and propaganda
  • the USSR’s role in the Allied victory in World War II.
Unit 4: The Changing European World Since 1945

This unit will examine the Cold War in Europe since 1945 and the changes that took place in its aftermath. Topics will include:

  • communism and capitalism
  • the Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, and the Berlin Blockade
  • peaceful coexistence
  • the Arms Race and the Space Race
  • the Berlin Wall
  • the Cuban Missile Crisis
  • Khrushchev and Gorbachev
  • the collapse of Communism
  • the reunification of Germany
  • the European Union

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Physical Education Studies General Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr de Bruyn (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Physical Education in Year 10. You will need to have demonstrated an excellent attitude to PE in Years 7-10, have participated in an array of sports, and shown an interest in the theory components of Health and Physical Education in Year 10.

Why Study Physical Education?
  • To develop an understanding of the human body that God created and its amazing functions, particularly as it relates to sport and exercise.
  • To learn new skills and be able to teach these skills to others through the methods of coaching, so that others learn how to participate in sporting activities safely and with positive and beneficial outcomes.
  • To acquire knowledge and skills that may lead to employment within the sporting and fitness industries.

The General PE course (rather than the ATAR course) is suited to students not looking to achieve an ATAR score or those that are away at TAFE or workplace learning during the week.

Course Overview

‘Do you not know that your bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were brought at a price. Therefore, honour God with your bodies’ (1 Cor 9:19-20)

In studying Physical Education you will have the opportunity to apply skills, strategies, and tactics to a variety of physical activity contexts. You will learn functional anatomy and basic biomechanical concepts as well as how to develop their fitness levels by applying training principles.

You will apply coaching principles to physical activities and learn how the body systems adapt to exercise. You will learn and apply mental skills training techniques to enhance performance.

The course has a strong theory component as well as a practical component. The assessment weighting is 50% each.

Clothing Requirements

You will be required to wear the full, correct sports uniform for all of the practical tasks. This includes proper sports shoes. You will be required to change back into regular school uniform and footwear for other classes.

This course leads to Physical Education Studies General Units 3-4 in Year 12 and is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Physical Education Studies General Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr de Bruyn (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Physical Education Generla Units 1-2 with a demonstrated desire to continue learning about Health and Physical Education concepts.

Students choosing Physical Education Studies are those that have an interest in the theoretical aspects of Physical Education as well as wanting to develop their Physical Education skills in practical contexts.

Why Study Physical Education?
  • To develop an understanding of the human body that God created and its amazing functions, particularly as it relates to sport and exercise.
  • To learn new skills and be able to teach these skills to others through the methods of coaching, so that others learn how to participate in sporting activities safely and with positive and beneficial outcomes.
  • To acquire knowledge and skills that may lead to employment within the sporting and fitness industries.

The General PE course (rather than the ATAR course) is suited to students not looking to achieve an ATAR score or those that are away at TAFE or workplace learning during the week.

Course Overview

‘Do you not know that your bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore, honour God with your bodies’ (1 Cor 6:19-20)

Physical Education Studies contributes to the development of your physical, social, and emotional growth. You will learn about physiological, psychological, and biomechanical principles and apply these to analyse and improve personal and group performances in physical activities.

In the course, you will learn through integrated written, oral, and active learning experiences. The course also provides you with opportunities to develop skills that will enable you to pursue personal interests in physical activity as athletes, coaches, officials, administrators, or volunteers.

This course includes an Externally Set Task, which is worth 15% of the final mark.

Clothing Requirements

You will be required to wear the full, correct sports uniform for all of the practical tasks. This includes proper sports shoes. You will be required to change back into regular school uniform and footwear for other classes.

This course is suitable for students seeking Training WA or vocational entrance.

Physical Education Studies ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr de Bruyn
Prerequisites: A minimum B grade in Year 10 Health and PE and/or Specialist Sport. You will also need to demonstrate an excellent attitude in PE by participating in an array of sports, wearing correct and appropriate sporting attire, and having an interest in the theory components of Sports Science. 

Why Study ATAR Physical Education?

If you have an active interest in sport or wish to develop a greater understanding of how the body is trained for sporting pursuits, you will enjoy and benefit from the study of Physical Education. You will study what is necessary to perform with excellence and efficiency in all movement areas.

Furthermore, if you are interested in pursuing a career in the Sport and Fitness or Health Science industries, you will benefit from the foundational body of knowledge examined in this course.

Course Overview

‘Do you not know that your bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore, honour God with your bodies’ (1 Cor 6:19-20)

Physical Education Studies contributes to the development of your physical, social, and emotional growth. You will learn about physiological, psychological, and biomechanical principles and apply these to analyse and improve personal and group performances in physical activities.

Throughout the course, you will learn through integrated written, oral, and active learning experiences. The course also provides you with opportunities to develop skills that will enable you to pursue personal interests and potential in physical activity as athletes, coaches, officials, administrators, or volunteers.

Clothing Requirements

You will be required to wear the full, correct sports uniform for all practical tasks. This includes proper sports shoes. You will be required to change back into regular school uniform and footwear for other classes.

These units lead to Physical Education Studies ATAR Units 3-4 in Year 12 and are suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Physical Education Studies ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr de Bruyn
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Physical Education ATAR Units 1-2. You will also need to demonstrate an ongoing desire to learn about more advanced Physical Education concepts. It is also highly desirable for you to be proficient in at least one mainstream sport, as the course has an externally-assessed practical component.

Why Study ATAR Physical Education?

You should have the desire to use Physical Education Studies as a contributing subject to your ATAR score and aim to complete tertiary studies in the fields of sport, fitness, health, or science.

Course Overview

‘Do you not know that your bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore, honour God with your bodies’ (1 Cor 6:19-20).

Building upon the development of knowledge through Units 1-2, you will cover more advanced concepts in the areas studied. These include:

  • functional anatomy
  • biomechanics
  • exercise physiology
  • sport psychology
  • coaching and motor learning principles.

You will also be expected to enthusiastically participate in the sports analysed during the year to achieve a solid practical mark. You will need to prepare for an external practical exam in a sport of their choice (limited to the options selected by SCSA).

Clothing Requirements

You will be required to wear the full, correct sports uniform for all practical tasks. This includes proper sports shoes. You will be required to change back into regular school uniform and footwear for other classes.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Physics ATAR Units 1-2

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr Vasquez, Mr Taylor (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum B grade in the Physics component of Year 10 Science. If you do not meet this requirement, you may be admitted on a case by case basis according to the teacher’s judgement.

Senior School Science Pathways

To assist you in your Science subject choice, please refer to the following diagram:

Course Overview

Physics (at one time called Natural Philosophy) is the study of the nature of the inanimate parts of God’s creation. By observation and experimentation we discover the underlying order in the way objects behave, and formulate ‘laws’ and models, which enable us to predict their behaviour. Such study underlies our understanding of the properties of matter and is of fundamental importance in all branches of Engineering.

In the Physics ATAR course, you will learn how energy and energy transformations can shape the environment from the small scale, in quantum leaps inside an atom’s electron cloud, through the human scale, in vehicles and the human body, to the large scale, in interactions between galaxies.

You will have opportunities to develop your investigative and problem-solving skills and use analytical thinking to explain and predict physical phenomena. You will plan and conduct investigations to answer a range of questions, collect and interpret data and observations, and communicate your findings in an appropriate format.

Year 11 Physics ATAR consists of the following units:

  • Unit 1: Thermal, Nuclear, and Electrical Physics
  • Unit 2: Linear Motion and Waves

Each area of study is investigated within a real-life context. Together with the theoretical aspect of the course, you will learn laboratory skills and techniques, and make practical investigations into the topics being studied.

You are advised to study at least one of Maths Applications, Maths Methods, or Maths Specialist concurrently with Physics.
Specialist Maths is the most beneficial for Physics students (if you meet the prerequisites) though it is not essential for this course.

These units lead to Physics Units 3-4 in Year 12 and suitable for students seeking an ATAR score for university entrance.

Physics ATAR Units 3-4

Summary

List: B
More information: Mr Vasquez, Mr Taylor (HOLA)
Prerequisites: A minimum C grade in Physics ATAR Units 1-2. If you have not completed Units 1-2, you must show a strong physical science background and be a well-motivated student.

Course Overview

Physics is the study of the natures and behaviour of the inanimate parts of God’s creation. The course ranges from the invisibly small (fundamental particles) to the whole visible universe (cosmology). In all of this, we see the power of the God who created everything and the order that governs the behaviour of all matter.

The study of Physics develops our understanding of the properties of matter, as well as developing critical and analytical thinking. Physics is of great importance in all branches of Engineering. Year 12 Physics consists of the following units:

Unit 3: Gravity and Electromagnetism

You will investigate models of motion in gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields to explain how forces act at a distance.

Unit 4: Revolutions in Modern Physics

You will use the theory of electromagnetism to explain the production and propagation of electromagnetic waves. You will learn to investigate how shortcomings in existing theories have led to the development of the quantum theory of light and matter, the Special Theory of Relativity, and the Standard Model of Particle Physics.

Each area of study is investigated within a real-life context. Together with the theoretical aspect of the course, you will learn laboratory skills and techniques, making practical investigations into the topics studied. Both of these units build on concepts studied in the Physics ATAR Units 1-2 in Year 11.

You are advised to study one of Maths Applications, Maths Methods, or Maths Specialist concurrently with Physics. Maths Specialist is the most beneficial for the Physics student, though it is not essential for this course.

This ATAR course is suitable for students seeking university entrance.

Visual Arts General Units 1-2

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Foster, Mr Kuipers (HOLA)
Prerequisites: It is strongly recommended that you will have successfully completed Year 10 Art; however, students with artistic ability will be considered.

Why Study Visual Arts?

Within contemporary society there is an increasing demand for visual literacy: that is, the ability to perceive, understand, interpret, and evaluate visual information. This course enables you to develop your visual literacy skills to become more discriminating in your judgements.

Course Overview

The Visual Arts General course encompasses the practice and theory of the broad areas of art, craft, and design. You will have opportunities to express your imagination and develop personal imagery, skills, and engage in the making and presentation of artworks.

The Visual Arts General course encourages you to develop problem-solving skills together with creative and analytical ways of thinking.

The course content is divided into two areas: Art Making and Art Interpretation. You should be aware that there is a written component involving research assignments and evaluations. This course is designed to facilitate the achievement of four outcomes:

  • visual arts ideas
  • visual arts skills, techniques, and processes
  • responses to visual arts
  • visual arts in society

Each Unit involves one major project. Both Units will incorporate and encourage a Christian perspective of Art, recognising that our God is the ultimate artist of all things (Gen 1:1) who created man in His own image (Gen 1:27).

The focus of Unit 1 is Experiences. You will develop artworks based on your lives and personal experiences, and observations of their immediate environment and events.

The focus of Unit 2 is Explorations, using a variety of stimulus from local environments. You will participate in selected art activities aimed at developing their skills of observation as well as your appreciation of the visual arts in your everyday life.

Visual Arts General Units 3-4

Summary

List: A
More information: Mrs Foster, Mr Kuipers (HOLA)
Prerequisites: It is strongly recommended that you will have successfully completed Visual Arts General Units 1-2. An understanding of the Year 11 content is assumed knowledge for students taking the Year 12 course.

Why Study Visual Arts?

The Visual Arts General course encourages you to develop problem-solving skills together with creative and analytical ways of thinking.

Within contemporary society there is an increasing demand for visual literacy: that is, the ability to perceive, understand, interpret, and evaluate visual information. This course enables you to develop your visual literacy skills to become more discriminating in your judgements.

Course Overview

The Visual Arts General course encompasses the practice and theory of the broad areas of art, craft, and design. You will have opportunities to express your imagination and develop personal imagery, skills, and engage in the making and presentation of artworks.

The course content is divided into two areas: Art Making and Art Interpretation. You should also be aware that there is a written component involving research assignments and evaluations.

This course is designed to facilitate the achievement of four outcomes:

  • visual arts ideas
  • visual arts skills, techniques and processes
  • responses to visual arts
  • visual arts in society

The focus of Unit 3 is Inspirations. You will become aware that artists gain inspiration and generate ideas from diverse sources, including what is experienced, learned about, believed in, valued, imagined, or invented. You will develop your understanding of visual language and apply this to Art making and Art interpretation.

The focus of Unit 4 is Investigations. You will explore and develop ideas through the investigation of different artists, art forms, processes, and technologies.

Each Unit involves one major project. Both Units will incorporate and encourage a Christian perspective of Art, recognising that our God is the ultimate artist of all things (Gen 1:1) who created man in His own image (Gen 1:27).